Courses

Courses
Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Please use this page to search for courses in the current academic year and recent past. However, the most up-to-date version of our current course schedule with full time, date, and location information will always be on Class Search.

Subject Code Guide

NELC sorts courses by subject code. Most languages or language groups have a unique code. Courses under a language subject code include both introductory language sequences and advanced topics that may require knowledge of the language.

Students looking for non-language courses are generally going to be interested in NEAA and NEHC courses.

AANL Ancient Anatolian Languages (includes Hittite, Lycian, Lydian)
AKKD Akkadian (including Intro to Babylonian) 
ARAB Arabic
ARAM Aramaic
ARME Armenian
EGPT Egyptology 
GEEZ Ge'ez
HEBR Hebrew (Modern and Classical)
KAZK Kazak
NEAA Near Eastern Art and Archaeology
NEHC Near Eastern History and Civilizations
NELG Near Eastern Languages (usually topics in Comparative Semitics)
PERS Persian
SUMR Sumerian
TURK Turkish (includes Ottoman Turkish and Old Turkic)
UGAR Ugaritic
UZBK Uzbek

 

Courses

ARME 10101 Elementary Modern Armenian I

This three-quarter sequence focuses on the acquisition of speaking, listening, reading and basic writing skills in modern formal and spoken Armenian. The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and the basic grammatical structures to communicate their basic needs in Armenian, understand simple texts and to achieve a minimal level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian.

A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, or to pursue work in Armenia. A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement.

2019-2020 Autumn

GEEZ 10101 Elementary Ge'ez I

This course introduces the fundamentals of Ge'ez (Classical Ethiopic) with an overview of grammar and the writing system, as well as exercises in reading early monumental and simple narrative texts.

2019-2020 Autumn

TURK 10101 Elementary Turkish

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

2019-2020 Autumn

HEBR 10101 Elementary Classical Hebrew-1

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to acquire a knowledge of the vocabulary and grammar of Classical Hebrew sufficient to read prose texts with the occasional assistance of a dictionary. The first quarter focuses on the inflection of nouns and adjectives and begins the inflection of verbs. It includes translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis of forms.

2019-2020 Autumn

ARAB 10101 Elementary Arabic

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Osama Abu Eledam, Elkhidr Choudar, Zainab Hermes
2019-2020 Autumn

EGPT 10101 Intro to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs I

This sequence examines hieroglyphic writing and the grammar of the language of classical Egyptian literature.

2019-2020 Autumn

PERS 10101 Elementary Persian I

This sequence emphasizes all skills of language acquisition (reading, writing, listening, speaking). The goal is to enable the student towards the end of the sequence to read, understand, and translate simple texts in modern standard Persian and engage in short everyday dialogs. All the basic grammatical structures are covered.

AANL 10101 Elementary Hittite I

This is the first in a three-quarter sequence that covers the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of the Hittite language. It also familiarizes the student with the field’s tools (i.e., dictionaries, lexica, sign list). Readings come from all periods of Hittite history (1650 to 1180 B.C.).

2019-2020 Autumn

SUMR 10103 Elementary Sumerian III

This sequence covers the elements of Sumerian grammar, with reading exercises in Ur III, pre-Sargonic, and elementary literary texts.

2019-2020 Autumn

ARAM 10401 Elementary Syriac I

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to read Syriac literature with a high degree of comprehension. The course is divided into two segments. The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of Syriac grammar and vocabulary. The third quarter is spent reading a variety of Syriac prose and poetic texts and includes a review of grammar.

Second year standing

2019-2020 Autumn

AKKD 10501 Introduction to Babylonian I

Introduction to the grammar of Akkadian, specifically to the Old Babylonian dialect. The class covers the first half of the Old Babylonian grammar, an introduction to the cuneiform script, and easy translation exercises.

2019-2020 Autumn

TURK 10501 Intro to Turkic Languages I

The first quarter of a two-section course in which Elementary Kazakh and Elementary Uzbek will be offered as one class, with the option for students to study one or the other, or both simultaneously.

2019-2020 Autumn

HEBR 10501 Introduction to Modern Hebrew

The beginner’s course is the first of three sequential courses offered to students at the university. The course aims to introduce students to reading, writing and speaking Modern Hebrew. Toward that end all four-language skills are emphasized: comprehension of written and oral materials; reading of non-diacritical text; writing of directed sentences, paragraphs, and compositions; speaking. Students will learn the Hebrew root pattern system, and by the end of the year will have mastered the five (active) basic verb conjugations in both the past and present tenses (as well as simple future). This grammatical knowledge is complemented by an 800+ word vocabulary, which is presented with an eye toward the major syntactic structures, including the proper use of prepositions. At the end of the year, students will conduct short conversations in Hebrew; read materials designed to this level and write short compositions.

2019-2020 Autumn

ARAB 10501 Low Intermediate Arabic

This is a parallel sequence to the regular Intermediate track, tailored for students who may have completed Elementary Arabic in unorthodox ways: in the far past, intensively (in the summer, etc.) without the benefit of practice over time, through self-study, or who feel they are not ready for the intensive Intermediate level. The classes train students in all 4 skills, by focusing on certain themes and genres (poetry, songs, short stories, food, music). The courses will lead the student to the Intermediate Mid to Intermediate High level at the end of the sequence (depending on students’ levels upon entering the class). Depending on an informal assessment at the end of any of the 3 classes, students may enter the Intermediate or High Intermediate classes.

STAFF
2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 10666 Hell! Discussion about Hell in Middle Eastern Cultures"

The class looks at images of, and narratives about, hell, from depictions of hell in the Quran to depictions of contemporary refugee camps as modern infernos. We will also study the construction of the image of Satan (Iblis) and of demons (jins) in various Islamic texts. The class will focus on reading of primary sources in translation (The Quran, Ibn 'Arabi, Abu al-'Ala al-Ma'ari, Nagib Mahfouz, Ghassan Kanfani) and the text book "Locating Hell in Islamic Traditions" , edited by Christian Lange (Brill, 2015, open online access)

2019-2020 Autumn

HEBR 20001 Hebrew Letters and Inscriptions

Introduction to reading and analysis of pre-exilic Hebrew inscriptions, including Transjordanian dialects

Intermediate Classical Hebrew I-III or equivalent

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 20011 Ancient Empires I

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects-both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEAA 20100 Archaeological Methods and Interpretations

(NEHC 30100)

This course surveys (1) the wide range of methods used by archaeologists to recover and analyze evidence concerning the human past; and (2) the various theoretical paradigms archaeologists have employed to interpret their finds and reconstruct ancient societies and cultures.

2019-2020 Autumn

ARAB 20101 Intermediate Arabic

In this intermediate Arabic course, we will work through the second half of Al-Kitaab Part 2. As in any language course, we address all four of the fundamental skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A particular focus of this sequence, however, is ensuring that students have a solid, comprehensive understanding of the rules of Arabic syntax. In addition to readings and exercises from the textbook, we will increasingly make use of articles from Arabic-language news media.

Osama Abu Eledam, Elkhidr Choudar, Zainab Hermes, Kay Heikkinen
2019-2020 Autumn

ARME 20101 Intermediate Modern Armenian

The course is aiming to enable students to reach a reasonable level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The curriculum is heavily based on real life situations. Each class session includes a healthy balance of real-life like conversations (shopping, placing an order in a restaurant, asking directions, talking with natives, getting around in the city, banking, etc.), readings (e-mails, text messages, ads, news, etc.) and writings (messages, filling forms, etc). The students can also communicate in Armenian well beyond basic needs about the daily life and obtain some level of fluency in their professional interests. This sequence covers a wider-range vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments also include a selection of simple original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media.

ARME 10103 or an equivalent

2019-2020 Autumn

PERS 20101 Intermediate Persian I

The goal of this sequence is to enable the students to gain proficiency in all skills of language acquisition at a higher level. The student learns more complex grammatical structures, and gradually other levels of language (colloquial, literary) are introduced. Texts include selected articles, stories, and poetry (classical and modern).

PERS 10103

EGPT 20101 Middle Egyptian Texts I

This course features readings in a variety of genres, including historical, literary, and scientific texts.

Ella Karev
2019-2020 Autumn

TURK 20101 Intermediate Turkish I

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish. Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency

TURK 10103, or equivalent with intermediate level proficiency test

2019-2020 Autumn

HEBR 20104 Intermediate Classical Hebrew I

Review basic Classical Hebrew grammar, emphasis on morphology and basic syntax; review/acquire historical morphology; acquire facility in reading Biblical Hebrew prose

Elementary Classical Hebrew !-III or equivalent

2019-2020 Autumn

EGPT 20211 Late Egyptian Texts

Building on the basics of grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles learned in EGPT 20210, this course focuses on the reading and analysis of Late Egyptian texts from the various genres.

2019-2020 Autumn

AANL 20301 Hieroglyphic Luwian I

This course introduces the student to the grammar and hieroglyphic writing system of the Luwian language of Anatolia of the first millennium BC (1000 to 700). After a brief introduction of the grammar, we will start reading short hieroglyphic texts, increasing knowledge of both script and grammar until we are ready for the famous Karatepe text from Cilicia, the Phoenician-Luwian bilingual that was instrumental for the decipherment of both script and language.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEAA 20501 Intro to Islamic Archaeology

(NEHC 30501)

This course is an exploration of the continuities of Egyptian culture from the Ptolemaic period down to modern times, a span of over 2000 years. The emphasis will be on the archaeology of Coptic and Islamic Egypt. The focus will be on the role of medieval archaeology in amplifying the history of economic and social systems. It is this connective quality of archaeology which contributes to an understanding of Pharaonic culture and fills the gap between ancient and modern Egypt

2019-2020 Autumn

AKKD 20604 Intermediate Akkadian - The Standard Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic

We will read highlights of the Standard Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic including the creation and taming of Enkidu, the fight in the Cedar Forest, Gilgamesh and Ishtar, as well as the flood story. You will learn how to use advanced dictionaries and sign lists and to write score and composite editions of Mesopotamian literature.

One year of Akkadian

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 20692 Armenian History through Art and Culture

This 10-week crash-course surveys Armenian history and elements of culture (religion, mythology and music, manuscript illumination, art and architecture) as well as offer a mosaic of traditions and customs (festivals and feasts, birth and wedding rituals, funerary cult) of Armenia. It also discusses transformations of Armenian identity and symbols of ‘Armenianness’ through time (especially in Soviet and post-Soviet eras) based on such elements of national identity, as language, religion, art or shared history. Recommended for students with interest in Armenian Studies or related fields, in Area or Civilizations Studies, Art and Cultural Studies, etc.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 29899 Research Colloquium

Required of fourth-year students who are majoring in NELC. This is a workshop course designed to survey the fields represented by NELC and to assist students in researching andcompleting their Research Project. Students must get a Reading and Research form from their College Adviser and complete the form in order to be registered. Signatures are needed from the adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Please indicate on the form that you wish to register for NEHC 29899 Section 01.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 10101 Intro to the Middle East

Prior knowledge of the Middle East not required. This course aims to facilitate a general understanding of some key factors that have shaped life in this region, with primary emphasis on modern conditions and their background, and to provide exposure to some of the region's rich cultural diversity. This course can serve as a basis for the further study of the history, politics, and civilizations of the Middle East.

2019-2020 Spring

ARME 10103 Elementary Modern Armenian III

This three-quarter sequence focuses on the acquisition of speaking, listening, reading and basic writing skills in modern formal and spoken Armenian. The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and the basic grammatical structures to communicate their basic needs in Armenian, understand simple texts and to achieve a minimal level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian. A considerable amount of historical-political
and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, or to pursue work in Armenia. A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement.

ARME 10102 or an equivalent

2019-2020 Spring

GEEZ 10103 Readings in Classical Ethiopic

Please refer to previously existing course description

Introduction to Classical Ethiopic I+II

2019-2020 Spring

TURK 10103 Elementary Turkish

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

2019-2020 Spring

HEBR 10103 Elementary Classical Hebrew-3

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to acquire a knowledge of the vocabulary and grammar of Classical Hebrew sufficient to read prose texts with the occasional assistance of a dictionary. The first half of the third quarter finishes verb inflection and includes translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis. The second half of the quarter consists of selected readings from the prose texts of the Hebrew Bible.

HEBR 10102 or equivalent

2019-2020 Spring

ARAB 10103 Elementary Arabic

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Osama Abu Eledam, Elkhidr Choudar, Zainab Hermes
2019-2020 Spring

EGPT 10103 Middle Egyptian Texts III

This course features readings in a variety of genres, including historical, literary, and scientific texts.

2019-2020 Spring

PERS 10103 Elementary Persian III

This sequence emphasizes all skills of language acquisition (reading, writing, listening, speaking). The goal is to enable the student towards the end of the sequence to read, understand, and translate simple texts in modern standard Persian and engage in short everyday dialogs. All the basic grammatical structures are covered.

PERS 10102

AANL 10103 Elementary Hittite III

This is the first in a three-quarter sequence that covers the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of the Hittite language. It also familiarizes the student with the field’s tools (i.e., dictionaries, lexica, sign list). Readings come from all periods of Hittite history (1650 to 1180 B.C.).

Elementary Hittite - 2

2019-2020 Spring

ARAB 10251 Colloquial Egyptian Arabic: Language and Culture

This course introduces the student to the spoken language of Egypt, particularly of Cairo. Through extensive engagement with films, songs, talk shows, and other media, as well as productive student activities (skits, songs, riddles, etc.) the student will improve their listening and speaking skills. In addition, the course will introduce the student to the new phenomenon of written colloquial, found on social media as well as in some new literature.

Prerequisite: At least one year of MSA study. NOTE: contact instructor if interested in the course but it poses scheduling problems.

2019-2020 Spring

ARAM 10403 Elementary Syriac III

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to read Syriac literature with a high degree of comprehension. The course is divided into two segments. The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of Syriac grammar and vocabulary. The third quarter is spent reading a variety of Syriac prose and poetic texts and includes a review of grammar.

ARAM 10402 or equivalent

2019-2020 Spring

ARAB 10503 Low Intermediate Arabic

This is a parallel sequence to the regular Intermediate track, tailored for students who may have completed Elementary Arabic in unorthodox ways: in the far past, intensively (in the summer, etc.) without the benefit of practice over time, through self-study, or who feel they are not ready for the intensive Intermediate level. The classes train students in all 4 skills, by focusing on certain themes and genres (poetry, songs, short stories, food, music). The courses will lead the student to the Intermediate Mid to Intermediate High level at the end of the sequence (depending on students’ levels upon entering the class). Depending on an informal assessment at the end of any of the 3 classes, students may enter the Intermediate or High Intermediate classes.

STAFF
2019-2020 Spring

AKKD 10503 Introduction to Babylonian III

Selected readings of Akkadian texts in the Standard Babylonian dialect of the 1st millennium BC

Colton Siegmund
2019-2020 Spring

HEBR 10503 Introduction to Modern Hebrew

The beginner’s course is the first of three sequential courses offered to students at the university. The course aims to introduce students to reading, writing and speaking Modern Hebrew. Toward that end all four-language skills are emphasized: comprehension of written and oral materials; reading of non-diacritical text; writing of directed sentences, paragraphs, and compositions; speaking. Students will learn the Hebrew root pattern system, and by the end of the year will have mastered the five (active) basic verb conjugations in both the past and present tenses (as well as simple future). This grammatical knowledge is complemented by an 800+ word vocabulary, which is presented with an eye toward the major syntactic structures, including the proper use of prepositions. At the end of the year, students will conduct short conversations in Hebrew; read materials designed to this level and write short compositions.

2019-2020 Spring

HEBR 20003 Punic Inscriptions

Introduction to reading and analysis of Punic inscriptions

Phoenician Inscriptions

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20013 Ancient Empires III

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550-1069 BC), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and becoming one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20020 Encounters: Travelling and Meeting People Before Modernity [nb: This was accepted as a signature course]

This course will explore the exciting intersections of worldviews to understand how people of bygone societies imagined others, and how their perceptions may have been transformed as they encountered and developed a closer contact with people from other places. We will study primary sources on the contacts and interactions between individuals from different cultures, and explore the meaning of culture, identity, tradition and how borders between people were formed and crossed. What does it mean to belong to a culture and what results from an encounter with a foreign culture? Why were some encounters peaceful and others violent? What are the present-day analogues, in the age of mass migration, to such historical encounters? By exploring these questions, the course aims to provide historical perspectives on cross-cultural human encounters, as well probe into deep questions of identity and belonging.

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20085 BIG: Monumental Buildings and Sculptures in the Past and Present

(SIGN 26000)

The building of sculpted monuments and monumental architecture seems to be a universal human trait in all parts of the world, from the pyramids of ancient Egypt to the inuksuit cairns of the arctic Inuit. What explains our urge to create monumental things? Why are monuments built, and how do we experience them? This course explores various answers to these questions through the disciplines that most frequently address monuments: archaeology, architecture, and art history. In the process, we will encounter a number of the major theoretical trends that have characterized the humanities and social sciences in the past century. This course examines humankind’s monumental record through a series of famous case studies from around the world to investigate the social significance of monuments in their original ancient or modern contexts. We will also determine whether lessons learned from th¬e past can be applied to the study of monuments today, and whether studying modern monuments – including those from our immediate surroundings in Chicago – can help us understand those of the past.

2019-2020 Spring

TURK 20103 Intermediate Turkish III

The course emphasizes comprehension by listening to parts of Turkish movies and songs, and self-expression both in written and spoken Turkish. Students write essays, summaries and scenarios. Turkish literature of increasing complexity will gradually be introduced.

2019-2020 Spring

ARAB 20103 Intermediate Arabic

In this intermediate Arabic course, we will work through the second half of Al-Kitaab Part 2. As in any language course, we address all four of the fundamental skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A particular focus of this sequence, however, is ensuring that students have a solid, comprehensive understanding of the rules of Arabic syntax. In addition to readings and exercises from the textbook, we will increasingly make use of articles from Arabic-language news media.

Osama Abu Eledam, Elkhidr Choudar, Zainab Hermes, Kay Heikkinen
2019-2020 Spring

PERS 20103 Intermediate Persian III

The goal of this sequence is to enable the students to gain proficiency in all skills of language acquisition at a higher level. The student learns more complex grammatical structures, and gradually other levels of language (colloquial, literary) are introduced. Texts include selected articles, stories, and poetry (classical and modern).

PERS 20102-II

HEBR 20106 Intermediate Classical Hebrew III

Continue acquisition of basic Classical Hebrew, emphasis on syntax; increase familiarity with Biblical Hebrew poetry, emphasis on prophets; continue acquisition of basic historical morphology; introduction to reading ancient manuscripts.

Intermediate Classical Hebrew II or equivalent

2019-2020 Spring

EGPT 20210 Intro to Late Egyptian

This course is a comprehensive examination of the grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles of the nonliterary vernacular of New Kingdom Egypt (Dynasties XVII to XXIV), as exhibited by administrative and business documents, private letters, and official monuments. We also study the hybrid "literary Late Egyptian" used for tales and other compositions. Texts from the various genres are read and analyzed in EGPT 20211.

Rebecca Wang
2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20222 Masculinities in pre-modern Middle Eastern Literature

Have you ever wondered what men looked like, how they lived and loved in the pre-modern Middle East? In this class, we will encounter cuckolded husbands, muscular heroes, angry kings, mad lovers, and chivalrous bandits – all fictional. We will analyze how masculinities are constructed in selected passages of Arabic, Persian, and Turkish literature in translation, and evaluate normative expectations, caricatures, and anxieties about masculinities in the cultural consciousness of the pre-modern Middle East.
In this course, you will become familiar with theoretical principles of the study of masculinities as well as acquire tools for literary analysis and close reading. Case studies will be drawn from a variety of literary sources, such as the Thousand and One Nights (Alf Layla wa-layla), the Persian Book of Kings (Shāhnāmeh), the love story of Laylā and Majnūn, as well as other texts.

Alexandra Hoffmann
2019-2020 Spring

SUMR 20310 Sumerian Literary texts

This course looks at Sumerian Literary Texts.

2019-2020 Spring

HEBR 20521 Low Intermediate through Israeli Media

This course aims, primarily but not only, to meet the need of heritage students who one quarter to of Hebrew to meet college foreign language requirement. However, students. The course will introduce a more advanced verb and syntax structures, using both a text book and newspaper and video clips reflective current Israeli culture. Student would work on enhancing all skills: speaking, reading, comprehension and writing skills.

One year of Modern Hebrew

2019-2020 Spring

NEAA 20522 Late Levant: Archaeology of Islamic Syria-Palestine

(NEHC 30522)

This course is an exploration of the cultural patterns in the Levant from the late Byzantine period down to modern times, a span of some 1500 years. While the subject matter will be archaeological sites of this period in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan and Israel, the focus will be on the role of medieval archaeology in amplifying the history of economic and social systems. It is this connective quality of Islamic archaeology which contributes to an understanding of the earlier history and archaeology of this region.

2019-2020 Spring

ARME 10102 Elementary Modern Armenian II

This three-quarter sequence focuses on the acquisition of speaking, listening, reading and basic writing skills in modern formal and spoken Armenian. The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and the basic grammatical structures to communicate their basic needs in Armenian, understand simple texts and to achieve a minimal level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian. A considerable amount of historical-political
and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, or to pursue work in Armenia. A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement.

ARME 10101 or an equivalent

2019-2020 Winter

GEEZ 10102 Elementary Ge'ez II

Please refer to previously existing course description

Introduction to Classical Ethiopic I

2019-2020 Winter

TURK 10102 Elementary Turkish

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

2019-2020 Winter

HEBR 10102 Elementary Classical Hebrew-2

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to acquire a knowledge of the vocabulary and grammar of Classical Hebrew sufficient to read prose texts with the occasional assistance of a dictionary. The second quarter focuses on verb inflection and verbal sequences and includes translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis.

HEBR 10101 or equivalent

2019-2020 Winter

ARAB 10102 Elementary Arabic

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Osama Abu Eledam, Elkhidr Choudar, Zainab Hermes
2019-2020 Winter

EGPT 10102 Intro to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs II

This sequence examines hieroglyphic writing and the grammar of the language of classical Egyptian literature.

2019-2020 Winter

PERS 10102 Elementary Persian II

This sequence emphasizes all skills of language acquisition (reading, writing, listening, speaking). The goal is to enable the student towards the end of the sequence to read, understand, and translate simple texts in modern standard Persian and engage in short everyday dialogs. All the basic grammatical structures are covered.

PERS 10101

AANL 10102 Elementary Hittite II

This is the first in a three-quarter sequence that covers the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of the Hittite language. It also familiarizes the student with the field’s tools (i.e., dictionaries, lexica, sign list). Readings come from all periods of Hittite history (1650 to 1180 B.C.).

2019-2020 Winter

ARAM 10402 Elementary Syriac II

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to read Syriac literature with a high degree of comprehension. The course is divided into two segments. The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of Syriac grammar and vocabulary. The third quarter is spent reading a variety of Syriac prose and poetic texts and includes a review of grammar.

ARAM 10401 or equivalent

2019-2020 Winter

ARME 10501 Intro To Classical Armenian

The course focuses on the basic grammatical structure and vocabulary of the Classical Armenian language, Grabar (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). It enables students to achieve basic reading skills in the Classical Armenian language. Reading assignments include a wide selection of original Armenian literature, mostly works by 5th century historians, as well as passages from the Bible, while a considerable amount of historical and cultural issues about Armenia are discussed and illustrated through the text interpretations. Recommended for students with interests in Armenian Studies, Classics, Divinity, Indo-European or General Linguistics.

2019-2020 Winter

AKKD 10502 Introduction to Babylonian II

This course is the second quarter of the annual introductory sequence to the Babylonian language and the Cuneiform script. Students will further explore the grammar of Babylonian in its Old Babylonian dialect (19th-16th c. BCE) and read ancient inscriptions (especially the Laws of Hammu-rabi) in the Old Babylonian monumental script. They will also be introduced to the Old Babylonian cursive used in letters and the documents of everyday life.

2019-2020 Winter

TURK 10502 Intro to Turkic Languages II

The second quarter of a two-section course in which Elementary Kazakh and Elementary Uzbek will be offered as one class, with the option for students to study one or the other, or both simultaneously.

2019-2020 Winter

HEBR 10502 Introduction to Modern Hebrew

The beginner’s course is the first of three sequential courses offered to students at the university. The course aims to introduce students to reading, writing and speaking Modern Hebrew. Toward that end all four-language skills are emphasized: comprehension of written and oral materials; reading of non-diacritical text; writing of directed sentences, paragraphs, and compositions; speaking. Students will learn the Hebrew root pattern system, and by the end of the year will have mastered the five (active) basic verb conjugations in both the past and present tenses (as well as simple future). This grammatical knowledge is complemented by an 800+ word vocabulary, which is presented with an eye toward the major syntactic structures, including the proper use of prepositions. At the end of the year, students will conduct short conversations in Hebrew; read materials designed to this level and write short compositions.

2019-2020 Winter

ARAB 10502 Low Intermediate Arabic

This is a parallel sequence to the regular Intermediate track, tailored for students who may have completed Elementary Arabic in unorthodox ways: in the far past, intensively (in the summer, etc.) without the benefit of practice over time, through self-study, or who feel they are not ready for the intensive Intermediate level. The classes train students in all 4 skills, by focusing on certain themes and genres (poetry, songs, short stories, food, music). The courses will lead the student to the Intermediate Mid to Intermediate High level at the end of the sequence (depending on students’ levels upon entering the class). Depending on an informal assessment at the end of any of the 3 classes, students may enter the Intermediate or High Intermediate classes.

STAFF
2019-2020 Winter

HEBR 20002 Phoenician Inscriptions

Introduction to reading and analysis of Phoenician inscriptions

Hebrew Letters and Inscriptions

2019-2020 Winter

EGPT 20006 Egyptian Thought and Literature

This course employs English translations of ancient Egyptian literary texts to explore the genres, conventions and techniques of ancient Egyptian literature. Discussions of texts examine how the ancient Egyptians conceptualized and constructed their equivalent of literature, as well as the fuzzy boundaries and subtle interplay between autobiography, history, myth and fiction.

2019-2020 Winter

NEHC 20012 Ancient Empires II

This course introduces students to the Hittite Empire of ancient Anatolia. In existence from roughly 1750-1200 BCE, and spanning across modern Turkey and beyond, the Hittite Empire is one of the oldest and largest empires of the ancient world. We will be examining their history and their political and cultural accomplishments through analysis of their written records – composed in Hittite, the world’s first recorded Indo-European language – and their archaeological remains. In the process, we will also be examining the concept of “empire” itself: What is an empire, and how do anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians study this unique kind of political formation?

2019-2020 Winter

TURK 20102 Intermediate Turkish II

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish. Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency.

2019-2020 Winter

ARAB 20102 Intermediate Arabic

In this intermediate Arabic course, we will work through the second half of Al-Kitaab Part 2. As in any language course, we address all four of the fundamental skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A particular focus of this sequence, however, is ensuring that students have a solid, comprehensive understanding of the rules of Arabic syntax. In addition to readings and exercises from the textbook, we will increasingly make use of articles from Arabic-language news media.

Osama Abu Eledam, Elkhidr Choudar, Zainab Hermes, Kay Heikkinen
2019-2020 Winter

ARME 20102 Intermediate Modern Armenian II

The course is aiming to enable students to reach a reasonable level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The curriculum is heavily based on real life situations. Each class session includes a healthy balance of real-life like conversations (shopping, placing an order in a restaurant, asking directions, talking with natives, getting around in the city, banking, etc.), readings (e-mails, text messages, ads, news, etc.) and writings (messages, filling forms, etc). The students can also communicate in Armenian well beyond basic needs about the daily life and obtain some level of fluency in their professional interests. This sequence covers a wider-range vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments also include a selection of simple original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media.

ARME 20101 or the equivalent

2019-2020 Winter

PERS 20102 Intermediate Persian II

The goal of this sequence is to enable the students to gain proficiency in all skills of language acquisition at a higher level. The student learns more complex grammatical structures, and gradually other levels of language (colloquial, literary) are introduced. Texts include selected articles, stories, and poetry (classical and modern).

PERS 20101

EGPT 20102 Intro to Hieratic

This course introduces the cursive literary and administrative script of Middle Egyptian (corresponding to the Middle Kingdom period in Egypt) and is intended to provide familiarity with a variety of texts written in hieratic (e.g., literary tales, religious compositions, wisdom literature, letters, accounts, graffiti).

Theresa Tiliakos
2019-2020 Winter

HEBR 20105 Intermediate Classical Hebrew II

Continue acquisition of basic Classical Hebrew; continue acquisition of basic notions of historical grammar; acquire the rudiments of analysis of Biblical Hebrew poetry.

Intermediate Classical Hebrew II or erquivalent

2019-2020 Winter

NEAA 20532 Problems in Islamic Archaeology: The Islamic City

(NEHC 30532)

This course is intended to present the dominant typologies of Islamic ceramics, most of which have been studied from an art historical approach. Specific archaeological typologies will be assembled from published reports and presented in seminar meetings. Half of the course will consist of analysis of sherd collections, observatory analysis of typological criteria, and training in drawing these artifacts.

2019-2020 Winter

NEHC 29995 Research Project

In consultation with a faculty research adviser and with consent of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, students devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of their Research Project. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Please indicate that you wish to register for NEHC 29995 Section 01 with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

2019-2020 Winter

HEBR 30001 Intensive Modern Hebrew

This intensive, three-quarter sequence aims to bring students from the very beginner level to high-intermediate levels in all four skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening so that students can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew. Students will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 20001/30001 Ancient Near Eastern History and Society I

This course surveys the political, social, and economic history of ancient Egypt from pre-dynastic times (ca. 3400 B.C.) until the advent of Islam in the seventh century of our era.

Brian Muhs, Robert Ritner
2019-2020 Autumn

HEBR 30002 Intensive Modern Hebrew

This intensive, three-quarter sequence aims to bring students from the very beginner level to high-intermediate levels in all four skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening so that students can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew. Students will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study.

2019-2020 Winter

NEHC 20002/30002 Ancient Near Eastern History and Society 2: Mesopotamia

This course offers an overview of the history of Mesopotamia from its origins down to the Achaemenid and Hellenistic periods, when Mesopotamia became part of larger empires. Weeks 1 to 5, preceding mid-term exam, cover the periods ranging from the late Chalcolithic down to the end of the Middle Bronze age (late fifth to mid-second millennia BCE). Weeks 6 to 10 study the developments of the Late Bronze and Iron Ages, from the period of the archives of El-Amarna in the fourteenth century BCE down to the time of Alexander the Great in the late fourth century BCE.

2019-2020 Winter

HEBR 30003 Intensive Modern Hebrew

This intensive, three-quarter sequence aims to bring students from the very beginner level to high-intermediate levels in all four skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening so that students can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew. Students will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study.

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20003/30003 History and Society of the Ancient Near East - 3

This course introduces students to the history of ancient Anatolia and its neighbors from the first historical texts around 2000 BCE, with a short detour through prehistory and the appearance of Proto-Indo-European culture, to the arrival of Alexander the Great. Some of the famous ancient Near Eastern civilizations that we encounter include the Assyrians, Hittites, Phrygians, Lydians, Persians, and Israelites. We will focus on the information provided by inscriptions - especially political and socioeconomic history - as well as the relevant archaeological and art historical records. No prior knowledge of Anatolian or Near Eastern history is required.

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20004/30004 Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I: Mesopotamian Literature

This course gives an overview of the richness of Mesopotamian Literature (modern Iraq) written in the 3rd-1st millennium BC. We will read myths and epics written on clay tablets in the Sumerian and Akkadian language in English translation and discuss content and style, but also the religious, cultural and historic implications. Particular focus will be on the development of stories over time, the historical context of the literature and mythological figures. The texts treated cover not only the famous Epic of Gilgamesh, but also various legends of Sumerian and Akkadian kings, stories about Creation and World Order, and destruction. The topics covered range from the quest for immortality, epic heroes and monsters, sexuality and love.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 20005/30005 Ancient Near Eastern Thought & Literature. Anatolian/Hittite Literature

This course will provide an overview of Anatolian/Hittite literature, as "defined" by the Hittites themselves, in the wider historical-cultural context of the Ancient Near East. In the course of discussions, we will try to answer some important questions about Hittite inscriptions, such as: why were they written down, why were they kept, for whom were they intended, and what do the answers to these questions (apart from the primary content of the texts themselves) tell us about Hittite society?

2019-2020 Spring

NEAA 30015 Pottery of Ancient Anatolia

This course is an in-depth survey of the various ceramic traditions that have characterized Anatolia from the invention of pottery in the Neolithic period to the Islamic period (time permitting). We will use collections in the Oriental Institute Museum to gain hands-on familiarity with these corpora, although the ceramic repertoire of Anatolia is so vast and diverse that the class will also involve lectures and student presentations on ceramics only available in scholarly literature. This class is structured less as a teacher-directed instructional, and more as a collaborative project in which we become masters of the Anatolian ceramic repertoire together.

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20034/30034 From the Harem to Helem: Gender and Sexuality in the Modern Middle East

This course will provide a historical and theoretical survey of issues pertaining to gender and sexuality in the modern Middle East. First, we will outline the colonial legacies of gender politics and gendered discourses in modern Middle Eastern history. We will discuss orientalist constructions of the harem and the veil (Allouche, Laila Ahmed, Lila Abu-Loghod), and their contested afterlives across the Middle East. We will also explore colonial (homo)sexuality, and attendant critiques (Najmabadi, Massad). We will pay especial attention to local discourses about gender and sexuality, and trouble facile assumptions of “writing back” while attending to the various specificities of local discourses of everyday life across various sites of the Middle East. Eschewing reductive traps for more nuanced explorations of the specifics of life in Beirut, Cairo, Istanbul, or Tehran – as well as to rural areas – we will show how gender and sexuality
are constructed and practiced in these locales. In addition to foundational scholarly texts in the field, we will also engage with an array of cultural texts (films, novels, poetry, comics) and – where possible – have conversations with activists who are working in these sites via Skype/teleconferencing.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEAA 20070/30070 The Archaeology of Afghanistan

Afghanistan is the quintessential “crossroads of cultures” where the civilizations of the Near East, Central Asia, South Asia and China interacted over the millennia in a constantly shifting mixture of trade, emulation, migration, imperial formations, and periodic conflict. This complex history of contacts gave rise to some of the most important archaeological, artistic, architectural, and textual treasures in world cultural heritage – encompassing cultures as diverse as the Bronze Age cities of Bactria, the Persian Empire, the easternmost colonies founded by Alexander the Great and his Hellenistic successors, the Kushan empire astride the Silk Road, and the monumental Buddhas of Bamiyan. Although the first excavations began in the 1920’s, there has been only limited fieldwork in Afghanistan, and even this was truncated by the Soviet invasion in 1979 and the subsequent 35 years of continuous war in that country.
This course presents an introduction to the archaeology of Afghanistan from the Neolithic through the Medieval Islamic periods, focusing on sites in Afghanistan and the region’s cultural linkages to neighboring areas such as Iran, Central Asia, and South Asia. The final portion of the course will discuss the threats to Afghan cultural heritage, and current effort to preserve this patrimony. The course is intended for Undergraduate;Graduate who have had at least one introductory course in archaeology.

any introductory cours ein archaeology is desirable buit not required

2019-2020 Winter

NEAA 30091 Field Archaeology

This course takes place outside of Chicago and can only be taken by arrangement with the instructor well in advance of the quarter in which it is offered.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 20092/30092 Classical Arabic Linguistics

This course delves into debates in Arabic linguistics of the classical period (before the fifteenth century) on questions such as, What is the origin of language? How does language work? How do languages relate to one another? Where does the Arabic language come from? Is the distinction between literal and figurative uses of language real? We read writings by seminal Arabic linguists, such as al-Tabari, Abu Hilal al-‘Askari, Ibn Faris, al-Qadi ‘Abd al-Jabbar, and Ibn Taymiyya, addressing not only linguistics proper but also topics in fields such as Quranic exegesis, theology, and legal theory. We also discuss key works of secondary scholarship on the subject. Undergraduate students by instructor permission only.

3 years of Arabic or the equivalent

2019-2020 Autumn

TURK 30101 Advanced Turkish I

Advanced Turkish students will develop their language skills in speaking, reading, translating, listening, and writing, while learning about Turkish society and culture at the same time. To address all of these aspects each class is divided into three sections which focuses on a specific skill.

2019-2020 Autumn

TURK 30102 Advanced Turkish II

Advanced Turkish students will develop their language skills in speaking, reading, translating, listening, and writing, while learning about Turkish society and culture at the same time. To address all of these aspects each class is divided into three sections which focuses on a specific skill.

Staff
2019-2020 Winter

TURK 30103 Advanced Turkish III

Advanced Turkish students will develop their language skills in speaking, reading, translating, listening, and writing, while learning about Turkish society and culture at the same time. To address all of these aspects each class is divided into three sections which focuses on a specific skill.

2019-2020 Spring

EGPT 30120 Intro to Demotic

This course provides a basic introduction to the grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles of the administrative and literary stage of the Egyptian language and script used in the Late Period (into the Roman Empire).

2019-2020 Winter

EGPT 30121 Demotic Texts

Building on the basic grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles learned in EGPT 30120, this course focuses on the reading and analysis of various Demotic texts.

2019-2020 Spring

AANL 20150/30150 Art and Iconography of the Hittite Kingdom

This course offers an overview of the art/visual culture from the period of the Hittite Kingdom (1650-1200 BC). We will explore all materials (stone, metal, ceramics, etc.), problems of dating, iconography and its possible developments, questions of audience.

2019-2020 Winter

NEAA 20162/30162 Topics: Mesopotamian History II: Uruk Mesopotamia and Neighbor

The Uruk period (4th millennium BC) saw the emergence of the earliest known state societies, urbanism, kingship, writing, and colonial network extending from Mesopotamia across the Jazira and into neighboring resource zones in the Taurus and Zagros mountains. This seminar examines Uruk Mesopotamia and neighboring regions from several perspectives â€" an examination of key sites in Mesopotamia and contemporaneous local late chalcolithic polities in Syria, southeast Anatolia and Iran. The seminar also considers the main theoretical issues involved in understanding inter-regional interaction in the social, economic, and political organization of this period.

2019-2020 Spring

TURK 30200 Colloquium: Sources for the Study of Ottoman World

This course introduces the students the major sources for the study of Ottoman history and culture.

2019-2020 Autumn

ARAB 30201 High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I

This is a course for the rising advanced student of Arabic who wants to improve their facility with oral argumentation on issues of public and academic interest. Students will read, listen to, and write arguments for or against a point of view. Students will engage in mini debates every week, culminating in a team debate at the end of the quarter.

2019-2020 Autumn

ARAB 30202 High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II

This is a course for the rising advanced student of Arabic who wants to improve their facility with oral argumentation on issues of public and academic interest. Students will read, listen to, and write arguments for or against a point of view. Students will engage in mini debates every week, culminating in a team debate at the end of the quarter.

2019-2020 Winter

ARAB 30203 High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic III

This is a course for the rising advanced student of Arabic, focusing mostly on one well-known novel. In addition to a close reading of the work, students will lead discussions, give presentations, and engage with guest speakers around the cultural, historical and literary aspects of the work.

2019-2020 Spring

ARAB 30301 High Intermediate Classical Arabic I

This is a three-segment course offered in three quarters; Autumn, Winter and Spring. The main objective of the complete three segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should  know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues.

2019-2020 Autumn

ARAB 30302 High Intermediate Classical Arabic II

This is a three-segment course offered in three quarters; Autumn, Winter and Spring. The main objective of the complete three segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should  know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues.

2019-2020 Winter

ARAB 30303 High Intermediate Classical Arabic III

This is a three-segment course offered in three quarters; Autumn, Winter and Spring. The main objective of the complete three segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should  know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues.

2019-2020 Spring

PERS 30320 Ferdowsi's Shahnameh as Introduction to Persian Poetry

The Shahnameh, the Persian "Book of Kings," is generally classed as an epic or national epic. While it does not lack for battling champions and heroic saga, it also includes episodes in a variety of disparate genres and themes: creation narrative, mythology, folk tale, romance, royal chronicle, and political history.
In this course we gain familiarity with the style and language of Ferdowsi's Shahnameh by slow reading and discussion of select episodes in Persian, in tandem with a reading of the whole text in English translation. We approach the work as a foundational text of Iranian identity,; compendium of pre-Islamic mythology and lore; a centrifugal axis of Persianate civilization and Iranian monarchical tradition throughout Anatolia, Central Asia and South Asia; and as an instance of "world literature." We will read with an eye toward literary structure; genre; Indo-Iranian mythology; political theory and commentary; character psychology; ideals of masculinity, femininity and heroism; the interaction of text, oral tradition, illustration, scholarship, and translation in the shaping of the literary reception of the Shahnameh; and, of course, the meaning(s) of the work. We also address wider issues of textual scholarship: the sources of the Shahnameh, the scribal transmission of Ferdowsi’s text, and the production of modern critical editions and theories of textual editing.
Class discussions will be in English, though we will read together in class a limited selection of episodes in the Persian. The aim is to gain deep understanding of the language, the characters and the themes of the Shahnameh, as well as the philological skills necessary to read medieval Persian poetry.

2 years of Persian or the equivalent

2019-2020 Autumn

PERS 30321 Persian Poetry: Shahnameh II

The Shahnameh, the Persian "Book of Kings," is generally classed as an epic or national epic. While it does not lack for battling champions and heroic saga, it also includes episodes in a variety of disparate genres and themes: creation narrative, mythology, folk tale, romance, royal chronicle, and political history.
In this course we gain familiarity with the style and language of Ferdowsi's Shahnameh by slow reading and discussion of select episodes in Persian, in tandem with a reading of the whole text in English translation. We approach the work as a foundational text of Iranian identity,; compendium of pre-Islamic mythology and lore; a centrifugal axis of Persianate civilization and Iranian monarchical tradition throughout Anatolia, Central Asia and South Asia; and as an instance of "world literature." We will read with an eye toward literary structure; genre; Indo-Iranian mythology; political theory and commentary; character psychology; ideals of masculinity, femininity and heroism; the interaction of text, oral tradition, illustration, scholarship, and translation in the shaping of the literary reception of the Shahnameh; and, of course, the meaning(s) of the work. We also address wider issues of textual scholarship: the sources of the Shahnameh, the scribal transmission of Ferdowsi’s text, and the production of modern critical editions and theories of textual editing.
Class discussions will be in English, though we will read together in class a limited selection of episodes in the Persian. The aim is to gain deep understanding of the language, the characters and the themes of the Shahnameh, as well as the philological skills necessary to read medieval Persian poetry.

PERS 30320; 2 years of Persian or the equivalent.

2019-2020 Spring

AKKD 30330 Readings in the Semitic Texts from Ebla

In this class, we will read texts from the ancient Syrian site of Ebla, where thousands of texts dating to about the 24th century BCE were found. We will focus on those texts that were written in the local Semitic language, Eblaite, and discuss the grammar and orthography of these texts, especially in the light of how this language/dialect relates to Akkadian and other Semitic languages.

Intermediate Akkadian

2019-2020 Spring

NEAA 20332/30332 Trade and Exchange in the Ancient Near East

In this course, we will discuss premodern modes of economic exchange and their systemic societal effects in light of their institutional embedding, with emphasis on trade and markets in the ancient Mediterranean and Middle East.

2019-2020 Winter

AKKD 30363 Kassite Legal and Administrative Texts

We will read a choice of legal and administrative texts from the Kassite period (1400-1150 BC), including contracts, tables, receipts and letters. You will get an introduction to the Middle Babylonian dialect of Akkadian and learn how to approach those genres. We will also read unpublished material from photos, casts, and original tablets.

1 year of Akkadian

2019-2020 Winter

NEHC 20433/30433 Israeli Society from a Sociological Point of View

This course integrates between sociological themes such as stratification, gender, culture, ethnicity, race, religion, political sociology and economy in order to study the Israeli society with all its diversity. Israeli society is a unique case for sociological study. A young nation which on the one side has a successful economy, but on the other side is dealing with an ongoing conflict with its Arab and Palestinian neighbors. Inequality rates in Israel are among the highest in the OECD, based on class, gender, ethnicity and nationality. Israel is exhibiting opposite trends between promoting gay rights and becoming more religious. In its 70th year Israel is facing deep social and political dilemmas which intertwine with major sociological themes. This course wishes to reveal these dilemmas and their deep complexities. The course will be divided to meetings which in each of them sociological themes and theories will be explored and problematized vis-à-vis Israeli society.

Noa Lavie
2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 30435 From seclusion to Global Success: Creativity and Politics on Israeli Television

Television is one of the major media phenomena of the 20th and 21st centuries. Television had a significant part in the building of the modern nation-state and is, nowadays, one of the main manifestations of global capitalism. The Israeli television market went from one public channel, dominated by the government, to become a leading exporter of television content to the Western World. During the semester we will review the political history of global and Israeli TV, we will learn to distinguish between different TV genres such as soap opera, sitcom, "reality" TV and quality drama series. We will explain how the growth of various creative products and different genres reflected both the political and economic zeitgeist. Likewise, we will focus on how the unique characteristics of the Israeli television market brought about its international success. We will focus on the narratives of Israeli successful drama series such as Fauda (a series about an under-cover IDF unit aired on Netflix), In treatment (a psychological drama which was aired on HBO) and Homeland (an Israeli action format aired on Show-time) and try to explain their global success. We will also focus on how the various political minorities in Israel are represented on television and the political and social impact of their representation. In addition, we will discuss concepts such as "quality" and "trash" TV as concepts reflecting social, political and economic struggles. We will also discuss the changes which the digital era is bringing about and its impact on television at large and television in Israel.

Noa Lavie
2019-2020 Autumn

TURK 30501 Ottoman Turkish I

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2 years of Turkish, or equivalent

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 20501/30501 Islamic History and Society I

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 1100, including the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain.

2019-2020 Autumn

TURK 30502 Ottoman Turkish II

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2019-2020 Winter

NEHC 20502/30502 Islamic History and Society II

This course is the continuation of Islamic History and Society 1 and presumes a familiarity of early Islamic history, 600-1100. This course covers the period from roughly 1000 to 1750 and deals with, among other topics, the coming of the steppe people (Turks and Mongols), the Mongol successor states, and the rise of the great early modern Islamic empires (Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals), the relation of Islamic political entities with Russia and China. Mid-term and final exam required for Undergraduates

2019-2020 Winter

TURK 30503 Ottoman Turkish III

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20503/30503 Islamic History and Society III

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

2019-2020 Spring

ARAB 30588 Media Arabic

Media Arabic is a course designed for the advanced student of Modern Standard Arabic. The course objective is to improve students' listening comprehension and writing skills. Students will advance toward this goal through listening to and reading a variety of authentic materials from Arabic Media (on politics, literature, economics, education, women, youth, etc.).

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20601/30601 Islamic Thought & Literature I

This sequence explores the thought and literature of the Islamic world from the coming of Islam in the seventh century C.E. through the development and spread of its civilization in the medieval period and into the modern world. Including historical framework to establish chronology and geography, the course focuses on key aspects of Islamic intellectual history: scripture, law, theology, philosophy, literature, mysticism, political thought, historical writing, and archaeology. In addition to lectures and secondary background readings, students read and discuss samples of key primary texts, with a view to exploring Islamic civilization in the direct voices of the people who participated in creating it. All readings are in English translation. No prior background in the subject is required. This course sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 20602/30602 Islamic Thought and Literature II

What are the major developments in thinking and in literature in the Islamic world of the “middle periods” (c. 950 – 1800 C.E.). How did noteworthy Muslims at various points and places think through questions of life & death, man & God, faith & belief, the sacred & the profane, law & ethics, tradition vs. innovation, power & politics, class & gender, self & other? How did they wage war; make love; shape the built environment; eat & drink; tell stories; educate their youth; preserve the past; imagine the future; perform piety, devotion and spirituality; construe the virtuous life and righteous community, etc.? How did these ideas change over time? What are some of the famous, funny, naughty and nice books read in the pre-modern Muslim world?
We will survey a broad geographic area stretching from Morocco and Iberia to the Maldives and India – even into the New World – through lectures, secondary readings and discussion. You will engage with a variety of primary texts in English translation, as well as various visual, aural and material artifacts. How do the ideas, institutions, and literary works evolve in response to changing historical, demographic and religious circumstances? How do culture, ethnicity, gender, history, politics and religion interact to create individual Muslim identities and a multi-faceted intellectual milieu (consisting of the scientific, philosophical and theological production; the religious, educational, governmental, commercial and social institutions; the literary, artistic, musical, and constructs which together make up "Islamic Civilization).

Islamic Thought & Lit-1 or

2019-2020 Winter

HEBR 30603 Advanced Reading Course

This course develops advanced language skills through the study of narratives, prose, and poetry from various periods in the development of Modern Hebrew. Students will present readings in their own field of study.

Students should have at least 2 years of Modern Hebrew

staff
2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20603/30603 Islamic thought and literature III

This class explores works of Muslim intellectuals, who interpreted various aspects of Islamic philosophy, political theory and law in the modern age. We will look at diverse interpretations concerning the role of religion in a modern society, at secularized and historicized approaches to religion and at the critique of both religious establishments and nation states as articulated by Middle Eastern intellectuals. Consequently, we will contextualize concepts like “woman,” “nation,” “East” and “jihad” as we follow the meanings assigned to these conceptions by different intellectuals at different historical moments. The class likewise examines the ways in which Muslim reformers synthesized cultural trends to revive the Islamic faith in face of Western economic and political hegemony. Our debate will focus on the influence of the colonial settings on the formation of these new readings and on the ways in which Muslim thinkers both appropriated and critiqued Western notions of civilization and guidance. We will consider the impact of these new ideas on political theory, and in particular on the political systems which emerged in the modern Middle East. Finally, the class will scrutinize the ways in which Muslim writers manipulated new means of communication such as the print media in order to propagate their ideas regarding the nature of their state and society. Generally, we shall discuss secondary literature first and the primary sources later.

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 20605/30605 Sources for the Study of Islamic History

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic problems and concepts as well as the sources and methodology for the study of the premodern history of the Islamic world. Sources will be read in translation and discuss in class. The concepts and tools acquired will be applied to specific research projects to be submitted as term papers.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 30625 Approaches to the Study of the Ancient Near East

This is a required introductory course for all CMES ancient-track students.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 20630/30630 Introduction to Islamic Philosophy

This course offers an introduction to the terms and concepts current in Arabic philosophical writings in the classical period of Islamic thought (roughly 9th to 17th century). It begins with the movement to translate Greek texts into Arabic and the debate among Muslims about the validity of philosophy versus revelation. From a close reading of key works (in English) by important philosophers such as al-Kindī, al-Rāzī, al-Sijistānī, al-Fārābī, Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna), al-Ghazzālī, Ibn Bājja, Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Rushd (Averroes), Suhrawardī, and Mullā Ṣadrā, a series of lectures will follow the career of philosophy in the Islamic world, first as a 'foreign' science and then, later, as selectively rejected but also substantially accepted as a natural component of sophisticated discourse.

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 30643 Topics in Medieval Islamic Social History

The course reviews the issues and scholarship on various facets of the social history of the Islamic Near East, ca. 700-1500 CE), including Patterns of Social Organization (“class,” tribal or kinship ties, professional ties, ethnicity, etc.), the role of pastoral nomadism in Near Eastern societies, non-Muslim communities and their relations with Muslims, Women and Gender issues, Technology and Social Change, Historical Demography, and Urbanism.

Islamic History & society or equivalent.

2019-2020 Autumn

AANL 30701 Linguistic Methods for Extinct Languages

This course explores the ways linguistic theory can be used in the study of extinct languages. We will investigate how to use typological data and the predictive force of modern theories to critically assess claims regarding grammatical issues in extinct languages. We will also start developing a method for fact-finding in extinct languages. The course will focus on topics that are relevant for several extinct languages of the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern area, covering many extinct languages, such as the (near)-isolates Sumerian, Elamite, or Hurrian, the Semitic languages (e.g., Akkadian, Phoenician, Ugaritic), the Indo-European languages (e.g., Latin, Greek, Hittite), and ancient Egyptian. Examples of such topics are (split)-ergativity, Topic and Focus (information structure), and lexical and grammatical aspect.

Knowledge of an ancient language

2019-2020 Winter

NEHC 20766/30766 Shamans and Oral Poets of Central Asia

This course explores the rituals, oral literature, and music associated with the nomadic cultures of Central Eurasia.

2019-2020 Spring

ARAB 30800 Arabic for Heritage Learners

This course is meant to prepare heritage speakers of Arabic to enter either Arabic 202 or Arabic 302 in the Winter Quarter. By “heritage” learners, we mean those students who know the alphabet, speak or have spoken Arabic at home, are familiar with a broad vocabulary but lack the grammatical underpinnings of Arabic, its case system, its structure, verb forms, etc. As such, the course will train students in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Modern Standard Arabic, but with an overt and systematic focus on grammar. Materials used will be authentic, up-to-date, and relevant to student interests. In addition, the class will host guests from Chicago’s Arab community to visit and speak with the students.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 20837/30837 Early Turkish Republic I

This course will examine the development of the Turkish state following WWI including questions of economy, institutions, and identity formation. The first quarter make be taken as a free-standing colloquium, or students may take both quarters and produce a research paper.

open to graduate students and to upper division Undergraduates

2019-2020 Winter

NEHC 20840/30840 Radical Islamic Pieties, 1200–1600

This course examines responses to the Mongol destruction of the Abbasid caliphate in 1258 and the background to formation of regional Muslim empires. Topics include the opening of confessional boundaries; Ibn Arabi, Ibn Taymiyya, and Ibn Khaldun; the development of alternative spiritualities, mysticism, and messianism in the fifteenth century; and transconfessionalism, antinomianism, and the articulation of sacral sovereignties in the sixteenth century. All work in English. This course is offered in alternate years.

Some knowledge of primary languages (i.e., Arabic, French, German, Greek, Latin, Persian, Spanish, Turkish) helpful.

2019-2020 Winter

NEHC 30847 History of the Early Turkish Republic II

This is the continuation of NEHC 20837/20837: History Early Turkish Republic I. Students will produce a seminar/research paper and meet to discuss selected readings on the transition from Ottoman Empire to Turkish Republic and the consolidation of the Republican regime.

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 30852 The Ottoman World in the Age of Suleyman the Magnificent

This two-quarter seminar focuses on the transformation of the Muslim Ottoman principality into an imperial entity--after the conquest of Constantinople in 1453--that laid claim to inheritance of Alexandrine, Roman/Byzantine, Mongol/Chinggisid, and Islamic models of Old World Empire at the dawn of the early modern era. Special attention is paid to the transformation of Ottoman imperialism in the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Lawgiver (1520-1566), who appeared to give the Empire its “classical” form. Topics include: the Mongol legacy; the reformulation of the relationship between political and religious institutions; mysticism and the creation of divine kingship; Muslim-Christian competition (with special reference to Spain and Italy) and the formation of early modernity; the articulation of bureaucratized hierarchy; and comparison of Muslim Ottoman, Iranian Safavid, and Christian European imperialisms. The first quarter comprises a chronological overview of major themes in Ottoman history, 1300-1600; the second quarter is divided between the examination of particular themes in comparative perspective (for example, the dissolution and recreation of religious institutions in Islamdom and Christendom) and student presentations of research for the seminar paper. In addition to seminar papers, students will be required to give an oral presentation on a designated primary or secondary source in the course of the seminar.

Upper level undergrads with consent only; reading knowledge of at least 1 European Language recommended

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 30853 The Ottoman World in the Age of Suleyman the Magnificent

This two-quarter seminar focuses on the transformation of the Muslim Ottoman principality into an imperial entity--after the conquest of Constantinople in 1453--that laid claim to inheritance of Alexandrine, Roman/Byzantine, Mongol/Chinggisid, and Islamic models of Old World Empire at the dawn of the early modern era. Special attention is paid to the transformation of Ottoman imperialism in the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Lawgiver (1520-1566), who appeared to give the Empire its “classical” form. Topics include: the Mongol legacy; the reformulation of the relationship between political and religious institutions; mysticism and the creation of divine kingship; Muslim-Christian competition (with special reference to Spain and Italy) and the formation of early modernity; the articulation of bureaucratized hierarchy; and comparison of Muslim Ottoman, Iranian Safavid, and Christian European imperialisms. The first quarter comprises a chronological overview of major themes in Ottoman history, 1300-1600; the second quarter is divided between the examination of particular themes in comparative perspective (for example, the dissolution and recreation of religious institutions in Islamdom and Christendom) and student presentations of research for the seminar paper. In addition to seminar papers, students will be required to give an oral presentation on a designated primary or secondary source in the course of the seminar.

Upper level undergrads with consent only; reading knowledge of at least 1 European Language recommended

2019-2020 Winter

NEHC 30937 Nationalism, colonialism and post colonialism in the Middle East

This graduate seminar offers a historiographical overview of the approaches to sect, religion, minority and gender in colonial and postcolonial contexts in the Middle East. We will discuss the conceptualizations of nationalism by different social scientists; explore the characteristics of Iranian, Turkish and Arab nationalism[s] in the years 1860-1979; examine the history of science and technology in the region and its influence on perceptions of Islamic modernity,; and ask whether sectarianism an old phenomenon or a new one, paying heed to the relationship between minorities and religions in the region.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 25222/35222 Readings in Syriac Literature

This course provides the student with an introduction to the major authors and various genres of
Syriac literature, including chronicles and historical texts, hagiography, biblical
commentary, and letters/responsa. Following this introduction, selected portions of several
Syriac texts will be read in English translation and discussed in class. A brief (6-10 pages)
paper and class presentation will be required (topic subject to the approval of the
instructor). There will also be a final exam.

2019-2020 Spring

NEAA 40020 Ceramic Analysis in Archaeology

(ANTH 36200)

At archaeological sites following the invention of pottery roughly 10,000 BCE, ceramics are the single most frequent and ubiquitous class of artefact that archaeologists uncover. This class, which will be conducted in the Oriental Institute Museum as a combination of lectures, discussions, and hands-on interactions with ancient and modern ceramics, surveys the methods and interpretive techniques that archaeologists use when studying this important category of material culture. Specific topics include manufacturing techniques, craft specialization, typology and chronology, production and exchange, scientific analyses, stylistic and functional analysis, and socio-political organization.

Any course in ancient history or archaeology

2019-2020 Winter

ARAB 40101 Advanced Arabic Syntax I

This two-quarter sequence is an introduction to the classical Arabic language. It is useful for students whose research includes the reading of classical Arabic texts in varied fields such as literature, history, political science, theology and philosophy. In the class 1) rules of Arabic grammar are studied intensively, topic by topic; 2) parsing (i'rab) is an important component, with a view to understanding the structure of the language; 3) brief texts from different fields of classical Arabic are read focusing on their grammatical structure, and 4) some theory about the development of the grammatical genre is introduced, as are the basic features of prosody ('arud) and rhetoric (balagha).

3 years of Arabic or equivalent

2019-2020 Autumn

ARAB 40102 Advanced Arabic Syntax II

This two-quarter sequence is an introduction to the classical Arabic language. It is useful for students whose research includes the reading of classical Arabic texts in varied fields such as literature, history, political science, theology and philosophy. In the class 1) rules of Arabic grammar are studied intensively, topic by topic; 2) parsing (i'rab) is an important component, with a view to understanding the structure of the language; 3) brief texts from different fields of classical Arabic are read focusing on their grammatical structure, and 4) some theory about the development of the grammatical genre is introduced, as are the basic features of prosody ('arud) and rhetoric (balagha).

ARAB 40101 or equivalent. This is the second part of a 2 quarter sequence; open to grads and undergrads

2019-2020 Spring

NEHC 40122 Nations in Crisis, Nations in Diaspora - a Comparative study of the histories of modern Iraq and Palestine in the 20th century

The class compares the histories of both Iraq and Palestine to explore questions relating to colonialism, nationalism and resistance in the modern Middle East. Each class will take up a theme, ranging from arm resistance to gender roles in post colonialist contextS, and will compare the Iraqi to the Palestinian case. GRADUATE Seminar, three hours,

2019-2020 Spring

ARAB 40200 Advanced Readings

The goal of Advanced Readings in Arabic (1 and 2) is that students achieve the advanced-low level of reading proficiency, at least, by the end of the two terms, while improving their ability to write and speak fluently in MSA. To accomplish this, we will read, discuss, and enjoy a variety of short modern fiction in Arabic (short stories, novellas, and novels) by twentieth- and twenty-first-century writers. Open to students who have taken Arabic 30203 or 30303 or who have reached a commensurate level.

2019-2020 Autumn

ARAB 40200 Advanced Readings

Advanced Readings in Arabic

2019-2020 Winter

AKKD 40341 Cuneiform Epigraphy

The course offers advanced students in Cuneiform Studies the opportunity to study actual documents from the Oriental Institute’s Tablet Collection. Through direct examination of cuneiform tablets of different genres, periods and regions, students will be made aware of evolutions and variations in paleography (ductus and sign values), document formatting, formularies and dialects. They will be guided though the process of establishing a formal edition of cuneiform documents and inscribed seal impressions, including transliteration, translation, and hand-copy.

2 years of Akkadian

2019-2020 Autumn

ARAB 40388 Readings in Early Islamic Apocalyptic Literature

The course explores the role of eschatological and apocalyptic ideas in the inception and early history of the Islamic community, through readings of relevant Arabic sources from the seventh through ninth centuries CE, and modern scholarship exploring these issues.

at least 2, preferably 3, years of Arabic. Undergrads admitted with my permission.

2019-2020 Spring

TURK 40589 Colloquium: Advanced Ottoman Historical Texts

Based on selected readings from major Ottoman chronicles from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries, the course provides an introduction to the use of primary narrative materials and an overview of the development and range of Ottoman historical writing. Knowledge of modern and Ottoman Turkish required.

2019-2020 Autumn

NEHC 40925 Readings in Islamic Law

This course provides a survey of the primary literatures of Islamic law and their treatment in modern scholarship. Primary texts read and discussed in class cover the following genres: compendium (mukhtasar), commentary (sharh), legal disputation (jadal), legal theory (usul al-fiqh), legal maxims (qawa’id fiqhiyya), handbooks for judges (adab al-qadi), handbooks for muftis (adab al-mufti), and legal responsa (fatawa). We will read closely selected excerpts from each of these genres and discuss relevant secondary literature in order to contextualize the primary texts thematically and historically and to examine critically the research questions that have thus far animated the modern study of Islamic law. Undergraduate students by instructor permission only.

3 years of Arabic or the equivalent

2019-2020 Autumn