Courses

Courses
Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Please use this page to search for courses in the current academic year and recent past. However, the most up-to-date version of our current course schedule with full time, date, and location information will always be on Class Search.

Subject Code Guide

NELC sorts courses by subject code. Most languages or language groups have a unique code. Courses under a language subject code include both introductory language sequences and advanced topics that may require knowledge of the language.

Students looking for non-language courses are generally going to be interested in NEAA and NEHC courses.

AANL Ancient Anatolian Languages (includes Hittite, Lycian, Lydian)
AKKD Akkadian (including Intro to Babylonian) 
ARAB Arabic
ARAM Aramaic
ARME Armenian
EGPT Egyptology 
GEEZ Ge'ez
HEBR Hebrew (Modern and Classical)
KAZK Kazak
NEAA Near Eastern Art and Archaeology
NEHC Near Eastern History and Civilizations
NELG Near Eastern Languages (usually topics in Comparative Semitics)
PERS Persian
SUMR Sumerian
TURK Turkish (includes Ottoman Turkish and Old Turkic)
UGAR Ugaritic
UZBK Uzbek

 

Courses

NEHC 20011 Ancient Empires-1: The Hittite Empire

(CLCV 25700, HIST 15602)

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 10101 Intro To The Middle East

(HIST 15801)

Designed for those with no previous knowledge of the Middle East, this course aims to facilitate a general understanding of some key factors that have shaped life in this region, with primary emphasis on modern conditions and their background, and to provide exposure to some of the region's rich cultural diversity. The course can serve as a basis for the further study of the history, politics, and civilizations of the Middle East.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20013 Ancient Empires-3: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom

(CLCV 25900, HIST 15604)

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered.

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550-1069 BC), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and becoming one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20165 Religious Minorities in the Islamic Middle East

This course will explore four broad aspects of Middle Eastern religious minority communities: 1) their origins and histories; 2) their religious beliefs and cultures; 3) their relationships with political power and the religious majority; 4) their contemporary political situation and recent experiences. Prior knowledge of Islam or Middle East studies will be useful, but is not a prerequisite for this course

Matthew Barber
2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20464 Climate, Culture and Society in the Ancient Near East

(HIST 20310)

This course is part of the new curricular initiative Course Cluster on Climate Change, Culture and Society. Using primarily case studies from the Ancient Near East (from prehistory to the first millennium BCE) as a basis for discussion, the course will investigate the nature of the relationship between human societies and their environment, with a specific focus on situations of climatic change. Students will be invited to reflect on discourses on human-environment interactions from Herodotus to the IPCC, on notions such as environmental or social determinism, possibilism and reductionism, societal collapse and resilience, and on recent academic trends at the crossroads of Humanities, Social Sciences and Environmental Studies. This will allow them to develop critical skills that nurture their reflexions on current debates on anthropogenic climate change and the Anthropocene.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 31000 Before the Zodiac: Astronomy and Mathematics as Ancient Culture

(SIGN 26045)

Taking as its central theme the cultural situatedness of the earliest systems of mathematics and astronomy—from their origins in ancient Mesopotamia (Iraq, c. 3400 BCE) until the Common Era (CE)—this course explores topics in mathematical language and script, metrology, geometry and topology, music theory, definitions of time, models of stars and planets, medical astrology, and pan-astronomical hermeneutics in literature and an ancient board game. Pushing against boundaries separating the humanities and social and physical sciences, students discover how histories of science and mathematics could be decisively shaped not merely by sensory experience or axiomatic definition, but also by ideas and imagery derived from the cultures, societies, and aesthetics of their day.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20012 Ancient Empires: The Ottoman Empire

(CLCV 25800, HIST 15603)

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered.

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 20735 Persia: The First World Empire

(CLCV 23518)

Stretching from Pakistan to Egypt and Greece, the Achaemenid Persian Empire dominated the Middle East for over 200 years (559-330 BCE) and was the first world empire in history. The Persian Empire brought diverse cultures, such as those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Greece, under a single rule, and witnessed transformations in the economies, religions, and political structures of the ancient world. In this course, we will trace the rise and fall of the Persian Empire and its afterlife, as the history of the Persian Empire continues to affect how we conceive of the Middle East today.

2018-2019 Winter

ARAB 30381 Introduction to Arabic Poetry

(ISLM 30381)

This course is an introduction to the texts, contexts, functions and rhythms of Arabic poetry. Students read, translate, and analyze the most eloquent verse of the Arabic poetic canon, with a view to understanding its themes, metaphors, and forms. Among the genres studied are brigand poetry, love lyrics, court panegyrics, satires, and mystical poetry. In addition, students study the prosody and rhetoric that underpins these texts in order to acquire a feel for its music and aesthetics. Focus is on the classical material, but modern poetry is also introduced. Excerpts from poetry texts are read in the original Arabic, and full poems in translation.

Prerequisites: Two years of Arabic

2018-2019 Winter

ARAM 10101 Biblical Aramaic

(JWSC 11000-01)

This course provides a thorough introduction to the grammar of the Aramaic portions of the Hebrew Bible during the first few weeks. The remainder of the course is spent reading texts from the books of Daniel and Ezra.

Prerequisites: HEBR 10103 or equivalent

2018-2019 Autumn

PERS 10101 Elementary Persian-1

This sequence concentrates on modern written Persian as well as modern colloquial usage. Towards the end of the sequence the students will be able to read, write and speak Persian at an elementary level. Introducing the Iranian culture is also a goal. The class meets three hours a week with the instructor and two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

2018-2019 Autumn

ARME 10101 Elementary Modern Armenian-1

(EEUR 21100,EEUR 31100,LGLN 10101)

This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling the students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and basic grammatical structures and to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

2018-2019 Autumn

HEBR 10101 Elementary Classical Hebrew-1

(JWSC 22000-01 JWSG 30100-01)

The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of descriptive and historical grammar (including translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis).

2018-2019 Autumn

TURK 10101 Elementary Modern Turkish - 1

First Quarter of 1st Year Modern Turkish

2018-2019 Autumn

AANL 10101 Elementary Hittite 1

(LGLN 24600,LGLN 34600)

This is the first in a three-quarter sequence that covers the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of the Hittite language. It also familiarizes the student with the field's tools (i.e., dictionaries, lexica, sign list). Readings come from all periods of Hittite history (1650 to 1180 B.C.).

Prerequisite: Second-year standing

2018-2019 Autumn

EGPT 10101 Intro to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs 1

(ANCM 30500)

Beginning intro to Egyptian grammar and script

2018-2019 Autumn

KAZK 10101 Elementary Kazakh

1st year of Modern Kazakh language.

2018-2019 Autumn

SUMR 10101 Elementary Sumerian-1

The first quarter of Elementary Sumerian.

2018-2019 Winter

SUMR 10102 Elementary Sumerian-2

The second quarter of Elementary Sumerian.

2018-2019 Spring

ARAM 10102 Old Aramaic Inscriptions

(JWSC 11100)

Texts from the Old Aramaic period (c. 1000-600 BCE) are read with special attention to the dialectal differences among various subgroups of texts.

Prerequisites: ARAM 10101

2018-2019 Spring

KAZK 10102 Elementary Kazakh 2

Second Quarter of Elementary Modern Kazakh.

KAZK 10101 at U of Chicago, or eqivalent coursework with placement test and proficiency evaluation.

2018-2019 Winter

PERS 10102 Elementary Persian-2

This sequence concentrates on modern written Persian as well as modern colloquial usage. Towards the end of the sequence the students will be able to read, write and speak Persian at an elementary level. Introducing the Iranian culture is also a goal. The class meets three hours a week with the instructor and two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Prerequisites: PERS 10101

2018-2019 Winter

ARME 10102 Elementary Modern Armenian-2

(EEUR 21100,EEUR 31100,LGLN 10102)

This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling the students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and basic grammatical structures and to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

Prerequisites: ARME 10101 or equivalent

2018-2019 Winter

HEBR 10102 Elementary Classical Hebrew-2

(JWSC 22100, JWSG 30100)

The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of descriptive and historical grammar (including translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis).

Prerequisites: HEBR 10101

2018-2019 Winter

AANL 10102 Elementary Hittite 2

(LGLN 24700, LGLN 34700)

This is the second in a three-quarter sequence that covers the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of the Hittite language. It also familiarizes the student with the field's tools (i.e., dictionaries, lexica, sign list). Readings come from all periods of Hittite history (1650 to 1180 B.C.).

Prerequisites: AANL 10101

2018-2019 Winter

TURK 10102 Elementary Modern Turkish-2

2nd quarter of Elementary Modern Turkish.

Prerequisites: TURK 10101 or equivalent

2018-2019 Winter

EGPT 10102 Intro to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs 2

(ANCM 30501)

Beginning intro to Egyptian grammar and script

2018-2019 Winter

PERS 10103 Elementary Persian-3

This sequence concentrates on modern written Persian as well as modern colloquial usage. Towards the end of the sequence the students will be able to read, write and speak Persian at an elementary level. Introducing the Iranian culture is also a goal. The class meets three hours a week with the instructor and two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation

Prerequisites: PERS 10102

2018-2019 Spring

ARME 10103 Elementary Modern Armenian-3

(EEUR 21100,EEUR 31100,LGLN 10103)

This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling the students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and basic grammatical structures and to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

Prerequisites: ARME 10102 or equivalent

2018-2019 Spring

HEBR 10103 Elementary Classical Hebrew-3

(JWSC 22200,JWSG 30300)

The third quarter is spent examining prose passages from the Hebrew Bible and includes a review of grammar.

Prerequisites: HEBR 10102

2018-2019 Spring

TURK 10103 Elementary Modern Turkish-3

Third Quarter of Elementary Modern Turkish Language.

Prerequisites: TURK 10101 and 10102 at U of Chicago, or equivalent coursework with placement test and proficiency evaluation.

2018-2019 Spring

AANL 10103 Elementary Hittite-3

(LGLN 24800,LGLN 34800)

This is the third in a three-quarter sequence that covers the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of the Hittite language. It also familiarizes the student with the field's tools (i.e., dictionaries, lexica, sign list). Readings come from all periods of Hittite history (1650 to 1180 B.C.).

2018-2019 Spring

EGPT 10103 Middle Egyptian Texts I

This course features readings in a variety of genres, including historical, literary, and scientific texts.

Prerequisites: EGPT 10101-10102 or consent of the instructor

2018-2019 Spring

ARAM 10103 Imperial Aramaic

(JWSC 11200-01)

Texts from the Imperial Aramaic period (c. 600-200 BCE) are read with special attention to the historical development of the grammar of Aramaic during this time period.

Prerequisites: Second-year standing and ARAM 10101

2018-2019 Winter

EGPT 10201 Intro to Coptic

This course introduces the last native language of Egypt, which was in common use during the late Roman, Byzantine, and early Islamic periods (fourth to tenth centuries CE). Grammar and vocabulary of the standard Sahidic dialect are presented in preparation for reading biblical, monastic, and Gnostic literature, as well as a variety of historical and social documents.

2018-2019 Autumn

EGPT 10202 Coptic Texts

This course builds on the basics of grammar learned in EGPT 10201 and provides readings in a variety of Coptic texts (e.g., monastic texts, biblical excerpts, tales, Gnostic literature).

2018-2019 Winter

ARAB 10250 Colloquial Levantine 1

This is a proficiency-based course designed to develop the linguistic skills necessary for personal day-to-day life. The course focuses on spoken rather than Standard written Arabic, and will therefore target primarily the oral/aural skills. Through the knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic and the introduction of colloquial vocabulary, expressions and grammar, the course will build the students' competence in spoken Arabic. Students will also be introduced to the Levantine culture of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Palestine.

2018-2019 Winter

ARAB 10251 Colloquial Egyptian Arabic: Language and Culture

This course is meant to supplement the Novice-High student of Modern Standard Arabic with the spoken Arabic of Egypt (more precisely, of urban Egypt). As the largest Arab country (over 90 million), and with a vibrant presence on the cultural scene, the spoken language of Egypt will be introduced to students through this vibrant cultural production. We will use songs and films as well as social media exchanges, both written and oral, to bring Egyptian culture and spoken language to the student.

2018-2019 Spring

ARAB 10257 Colloquial Levantine 2

This is a proficiency-based course designed to develop the linguistic skills necessary for personal day-to-day life. The course focuses on spoken rather than Standard written Arabic, and will therefore target primarily the oral/aural skills. Through the knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic and the introduction of colloquial vocabulary, expressions and grammar, the course will build the students' competence in spoken Arabic. Students will also be introduced to the Levantine culture of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Palestine.

2018-2019 Spring

AKKD 10501 Introduction to Babylonian 1

This class provides an introduction to the Babylonian language (Akkadian), a Semitic language spoken and written in Mesopotamia from 2250-50 BCE. The participants will be introduced to grammar of the Old Babylonian period (ca. 19th to 16th BCE) and learn how to read cuneiform script. The reference grammar used for this course is John Huehnergard's A Grammar of Akkadian (third edition).

2018-2019 Autumn

HEBR 10501 Introductory Modern Hebrew

(JWSC 25000)

The beginner's class is the first of three sequential courses, offered through one academic year. The course aims to introduce students to reading, writing and speaking Modern Hebrew. Students gain experience with a variety of skills: • Comprehension: Reading & Listening to short texts and recorded conversations
• Conversation: Simple dialogues and stories
• Reading: dialogues and texts in non-diacritical easy Hebrew on various topics
• Writing: Short dialogues and passages on the topics taught in class
• Grammatical Skills: Elementary grammatical structures, inflection of the strong and some weak verb in the past and present tenses. Basic semantic and syntactic topics are also introduced.
By the end of that course, students usually know 800-1000 words and are expected to be able to conduct short conversations in Hebrew; read materials designed to this level and write short compositions.
Final grade is based on attendance, class participation, homework, quizzes and tests, oral exam.

2018-2019 Autumn

ARME 10501 Introduction to Classical Armenian

The course focuses on the basic grammatical structure and vocabulary of the Classical Armenian language, Grabar (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). It enables students to achieve basic reading skills in the Classical Armenian language. Reading assignments include a wide selection of original Armenian literature, mostly works by 5th century historians, as well as passages from the Bible, while a considerable amount of historical and cultural issues about Armenia are discussed and illustrated through the text interpretations. Recommended for students with interests in Armenian Studies, Classics, Divinity, Indo-European or General Linguistics.

Knowledge of Modern Armenian is preferred but not required.

2018-2019 Winter

AKKD 10502 Introduction to Babylonian 2

This course is the second quarter of the annual introductory sequence to the Babylonian language and the Cuneiform script. Students will further explore the grammar of Babylonian in its Old Babylonian dialect (19th–16th c. BCE) and read ancient inscriptions (especially the Laws of Hammu-rabi) in the Old Babylonian monumental script. The reference grammar used for this course is John Huehnergard's A Grammar of Akkadian (third edition), 2011.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Babylonian 1

2018-2019 Winter

HEBR 10502 Introductory Modern Hebrew - 2

(JWSC 25100)

The beginner's class is the first of three sequential courses, offered through one academic year. The course aims to introduce students to reading, writing and speaking Modern Hebrew. Students gain experience with a variety of skills: • Comprehension: Reading & Listening to short texts and recorded conversations
• Conversation: Simple dialogues and stories
• Reading: dialogues and texts in non-diacritical easy Hebrew on various topics
• Writing: Short dialogues and passages on the topics taught in class
• Grammatical Skills: Elementary grammatical structures, inflection of the strong and some weak verb in the past and present tenses. Basic semantic and syntactic topics are also introduced.
By the end of that course, students usually know 800-1000 words and are expected to be able to conduct short conversations in Hebrew; read materials designed to this level and write short compositions.
Final grade is based on attendance, class participation, homework, quizzes and tests, oral exam.

2018-2019 Winter

AKKD 10503 Introduction to Babylonian 3

Selected readings of Akkadian texts in the Standard Babylonian dialect of the 1st millennium BC.

Prerequisites: AKKD 10501 and AKKD 10502

2018-2019 Spring

HEBR 10503 Introductory Modern Hebrew - 3

(JWSC 25200)

The beginner's class is the first of three sequential courses, offered through one academic year. The course aims to introduce students to reading, writing and speaking Modern Hebrew. Students gain experience with a variety of skills: • Comprehension: Reading & Listening to short texts and recorded conversations
• Conversation: Simple dialogues and stories
• Reading: dialogues and texts in non-diacritical easy Hebrew on various topics
• Writing: Short dialogues and passages on the topics taught in class
• Grammatical Skills: Elementary grammatical structures, inflection of the strong and some weak verb in the past and present tenses. Basic semantic and syntactic topics are also introduced.
By the end of that course, students usually know 800-1000 words and are expected to be able to conduct short conversations in Hebrew; read materials designed to this level and write short compositions.
Final grade is based on attendance, class participation, homework, quizzes and tests, oral exam.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20005 Ancient Near Eastern Thought & Literature-2: Anatolian Lit

(NEHC 30005)

This course will provide an overview of Anatolian/Hittite literature, as “defined” by the Hittites themselves, in the wider historical-cultural context of the Ancient Near East. In the course of discussions, we will try to answer some important questions about Hittite inscriptions, such as: why were they written down, why were they kept, for whom were they intended, and what do the answers to these questions (apart from the primary content of the texts themselves) tell us about Hittite society?

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20006 Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature 3 : Egyptian Lit

(EGPT 30006, NEHC 30006)

This course employs English translations of ancient Egyptian literary texts to explore the genres, conventions and techniques of ancient Egyptian literature. Discussions of texts examine how the ancient Egyptians conceptualized and constructed their equivalent of literature, as well as the fuzzy boundaries and subtle interplay between autobiography, history, myth and fiction.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEAA 20006 Archaeology of the Ancient Near East-6; Egypt

(NEAA 30006-01)

This is the general introduction to Egyptian Archaeology which is part of the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East sequence.
This course will examine in detail the archaeology of ancient Egypt. The aim is to give a detailed overview of major sites and discoveries as well as including as much as possible material from recent excavations. Additionally, problems and priorities concerning fieldwork in Egypt will be discussed throughout this course.

Gregory Marouard
2018-2019 Winter

NEAA 20061 Ancient Landscapes 1

This is a two-course sequence that introduces students to theory and method in landscape studies and the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to analyze archaeological, anthropological, historical, and environmental data. Course one covers the theoretical and methodological background necessary to understand spatial approaches to landscape and the fundamentals of using ESRI's ArcGIS software, and further guides students in developing a research proposal. Course two covers more advanced GIS-based analysis (using vector, raster, and satellite remote sensing data) and guides students in carrying out their own spatial research project. In both courses, techniques are introduced through the discussion of case studies (focused on the archaeology of the Middle East) and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory times, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample archaeological data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student.

Anthony Lauricella
2018-2019 Autumn

NEAA 20062 Ancient Landscapes 2

This is a two-course sequence that introduces students to theory and method in landscape studies and the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to analyze archaeological, anthropological, historical, and environmental data. Course one covers the theoretical and methodological background necessary to understand spatial approaches to landscape and the fundamentals of using ESRI's ArcGIS software, and further guides students in developing a research proposal. Course two covers more advanced GIS-based analysis (using vector, raster, and satellite remote sensing data) and guides students in carrying out their own spatial research project. In both courses, techniques are introduced through the discussion of case studies (focused on the archaeology of the Middle East) and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory times, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample archaeological data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student.

Anthony Lauricella
2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 20091 Al-Ghazali

(ISLM 30091, NEHC 30091)

This course introduces students to the figure of Abu Hamid al-Ghazali and his enormously influential contributions to philosophy, theology, Sufism, and law. In addition to reading his writings, we examine al-Ghazali's reception in secondary scholarship and the various roles attributed to him – extinguisher of reason, proponent of double truth, architect of a grand synthesis. Open to undergraduates with sufficient Arabic and instructor permission.

Prerequisites: Two years of Arabic or the equivalent

2018-2019 Winter

EGPT 20101 Middle Egyptian Texts II

This course features readings in a variety of genres, including historical, literary, and scientific texts.

2018-2019 Autumn

PERS 20101 Intermediate Persian-1

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Prerequisites: PERS 10103

2018-2019 Autumn

ARME 20101 Intermediate Modern Armenian-1

(EEUR 21100,EEUR 31100,LGLN 20101)

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an Intermediate level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The course covers a rich vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

Prerequisites: ARME 10103 or equivalent

2018-2019 Autumn

UGAR 20101 Ugaritic-1

First readings in texts in the Ugaritic language (1250-1185BC).

Prerequisites: HEBR 20106 or equivalent

2018-2019 Autumn

TURK 20101 Intermediate Turkish-1

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish. Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency. 

Prerequisites: TURK 10103, or equivalent with intermediate level proficiency test.

2018-2019 Autumn

TURK 20102 Intermediate Turkish-2

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish. Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency. 

Prerequisite: TURK 10103, or equivalent with intermediate level proficiency test.

2018-2019 Winter

PERS 20102 Intermediate Persian-2

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation

Prerequisites: PERS 20101

2018-2019 Winter

ARME 20102 Intermediate Modern Armenian-2

(EEUR 21100,EEUR 21100,LGLN 20102)

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an Intermediate level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The course covers a rich vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

ARME 20101 or equivalent.

2018-2019 Winter

UGAR 20102 Ugaritic-2

Continued reading of texts in the Ugaritic language, emphasis on prose texts.

2018-2019 Winter

EGPT 20102 Intro to Hieratic

This course introduces the cursive literary and administrative script of Middle Egyptian (corresponding to the Middle Kingdom period in Egypt) and is intended to provide familiarity with a variety of texts written in hieratic (e.g., literary tales, religious compositions, wisdom literature, letters, accounts, graffiti).

EGPT 10101-10102-10103 or equivalent required; EGPT 20101 recommended

2018-2019 Winter

PERS 20103 Intermediate Persian-3

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

2018-2019 Spring

ARME 20103 Intermediate Modern Armenian-3

(EEUR 21100,EEUR 31100,LGLN 20103)

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an Intermediate level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The course covers a rich vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

Prerequisites: ARME 20102 or equivalent.

2018-2019 Spring

UGAR 20103 Ugaritic-3

Continued reading of texts in the Ugaritic language.

2018-2019 Spring

TURK 20103 Intermediate Turkish 3

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish. Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency.

Prerequisites: TURK 10103, or equivalent with intermediate level proficiency test.

2018-2019 Spring

HEBR 20104 Intermediate Classical Hebrew I

(JWSC 22300-01)

A continuation of Elementary Classical Hebrew. The first quarter consists of reviewing grammar, and of reading and analyzing further prose texts. The last two quarters are devoted to an introduction to Hebrew poetry with readings from Psalms, Proverbs, and the prophets

Prerequisites: HEBR 10103 or equivalent.

2018-2019 Autumn

HEBR 20105 Intermediate Classical Hebrew-2

(JWSC 22400-01)

A continuation of Elementary Classical Hebrew. The first quarter consists of reviewing grammar, and of reading and analyzing further prose texts. The last two quarters are devoted to an introduction to Hebrew poetry with readings from Psalms, Proverbs, and the prophets

Prerequisites: HEBR 20104 or equivalent.

2018-2019 Winter

HEBR 20106 Intermediate Classical Hebrew-3

(JWSC 22500)

A continuation of Elementary Classical Hebrew. The first quarter consists of reviewing grammar, and of reading and analyzing further prose texts. The last two quarters are devoted to an introduction to Hebrew poetry with readings from Psalms, Proverbs, and the prophets.

Prerequisites: HEBR 20105 or equivalent

2018-2019 Spring

EGPT 20110 Old Egyptian

Intro to OE texts and grammar

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20212 Introduction to Egyptian Religion and Magic

(NEHC 30122)

The course provides a general introduction to the theology and ritual practice of Ancient Egypt from the Predynastic Period to the late Roman Empire (ca. 3100 BC to AD 543).  Illustrated lectures will  survey primary mythology, the nature of Egyptian “magic,” the evolving role of the priesthood, the function of temple and tomb architecture, mummification and funerary rites, the Amarna revolution and the origins of monotheism, as well as the impact of Egyptian religion on neighboring belief systems.  Students will read a wide array of original texts in translation in addition to modern interpretive studies.  Course requirements include two (2) papers and a final exam.  In the first paper the student should discuss in 5-10 pages a specific deity or temple site.  The second paper should contain a concise analysis (5-10 pages) of a theological issue pertinent to class discussion and readings.  All topics must be cleared in advance with the instructor. Proper bibliographies and footnotes are expected, and any internet sources must be cleared with the instructor.

2018-2019 Spring

NELG 20301 Intro To Comparative Semitics

(NELG 30301)

This course is an introduction to the methodologies of Comparative and Historical Linguistics and basic data used for the reconstruction of the Semitic languages.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of two Semitic languages or one Semitic language and Historical Linguistics.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 20501 Islamic History and Society-1:The Rise of Islam & the Caliphate

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 1100, including the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 20502 Islamic History and Society-2: The Middle Periods

(NEHC 30502, HIST 25804, HIST 35804)

This course covers the period from ca. 1100 to 1750, including the arrival of the Steppe Peoples (Turks and Mongols), the Mongol successor states, and the Mamluks of Egypt and Syria. We also study the foundation of the great Islamic regional empires of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Moghuls.

Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 20503 Islamic History and Society -3: The Modern Middle East

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

2018-2019 Spring

NEAA 20512 Egypt after the Pharaohs: Archaeology of Coptic and Islamic Egy

(NEAA 30512)

This course is an exploration of the continuities of Egyptian culture from the Ptolemaic period down to modern times, a span of over 2000 years.  The emphasis will be on the archaeology of Coptic and Islamic Egypt.  The focus will be on the role of medieval archaeology in amplifying the history of economic and social systems.  It is this connective quality of archaeology which contributes to an understanding of Pharaonic culture and fills the gap between ancient and modern Egypt.

2018-2019 Spring

HEBR 20521 Lower Intermediate Hebrew Through Israeli Media

This one quarter course is designed to provide students with skills for viewing original movies, reading short newspaper articles as well as watching T.V. shows - all dealing with cultural and social issues in Israel. The learning stages include reading and listening comprehension, oral and written expression, vocabulary and grammar enrichment. The movies, articles and shows are supplemented with a simultaneous script and a dictionary. This courseware is suitable for students who had at least one year of Modern Hebrew studies or were placed into Intermediate Modern Hebrew. Consent of instructor is required.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20601 Islamic Thought & Literature-1

(NEHC 30601-01, SOSC 22000-01, RLST 20401-01, ISLM 30601-01, CMES 30601-01)

This sequence explores the thought and literature of the Islamic world from the coming of Islam in the seventh century C.E. through the development and spread of its civilization in the medieval period and into the modern world. Including historical framework to establish chronology and geography, the course focuses on key aspects of Islamic intellectual history: scripture, law, theology, philosophy, literature, mysticism, political thought, historical writing, and archaeology. In addition to lectures and secondary background readings, students read and discuss samples of key primary texts, with a view to exploring Islamic civilization in the direct voices of the people who participated in creating it. All readings are in English translation. No prior background in the subject is required. This course sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Students can meet the general education requirement in civilization studies by taking NEHC 20601 and either 20602 or 20603.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 20602 Islamic Thought & Literature-2

(SOSC, RLST, ISLM)

This course covers the period from ca. 950 to 1700. We survey works of literature, theology, philosophy, Sufism, politics, and history that were written in Arabic, Persian, and Turkish. We also consider the art, architecture, and music of the Islamicate traditions. Through primary texts, secondary sources, and lectures, we trace the cultural, social, religious, political, and institutional evolution through the period of the Fatimids, the Crusades, the Mongol invasions, and the “gunpowder empires” (Ottomans, Safavids, Mughals).

This sequence explores the thought and literature of the Islamic world from the coming of Islam in the seventh century C.E. through the development and spread of its civilization in the medieval period and into the modern world. Including historical framework to establish chronology and geography, the course focuses on key aspects of Islamic intellectual history: scripture, law, theology, philosophy, literature, mysticism, political thought, historical writing, and archaeology. In addition to lectures and secondary background readings, students read and discuss samples of key primary texts, with a view to exploring Islamic civilization in the direct voices of the people who participated in creating it. All readings are in English translation. No prior background in the subject is required. This course sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

NEHC 20601 (Islamic Thought and Lit–1) or NEHC 20501 (Islamic Hist and Soc–1). Partially fulfills Civilizational Studies requirement of the College.

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 20603 Islamic Thought and Literature-3

(SOSC, RLST, ISLM)

This course covers the period from ca. 1700 to the present. It explores Muslim intellectuals' engagement with tradition and modernity in the realms of religion, politics, literature, and law. We discuss debates concerning the role of religion in a modern society, perceptions of Europe and European influence, the challenges of maintain religious and cultural authenticity, and Muslim views of nation-states and nationalism in the Middle East. We also give consideration to the modern developments of transnational jihadism and the Arab Spring.

This sequence explores the thought and literature of the Islamic world from the coming of Islam in the seventh century C.E. through the development and spread of its civilization in the medieval period and into the modern world. Including historical framework to establish chronology and geography, the course focuses on key aspects of Islamic intellectual history: scripture, law, theology, philosophy, literature, mysticism, political thought, historical writing, and archaeology. In addition to lectures and secondary background readings, students read and discuss samples of key primary texts, with a view to exploring Islamic civilization in the direct voices of the people who participated in creating it. All readings are in English translation. No prior background in the subject is required. This course sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20615 Drawn Together: Comics Culture in the Middle East

(NEHC 30615)

This is a course about the rise of the graphic novel and comics culture in the Middle East. We will apply key theoretical materials from the field of comics studies to help us understand the influences, motivations and interventions of these graphic narratives in their cultural contexts. While we will primarily focus on the Arabic-speaking regions of the Middle East, the course will also include texts from Iran, Turkey, and the US and Europe.

In English. No prerequisites.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20765 Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia

(ANTH ,NEHC 20765 ,EEUR ,EEUR 30766, EALC, MUSI)

An ethnomusicological survey of the traditional musical cultures associated with the indigenous inhabitants of Central Eurasia.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20840 Radical Islamic Pieties, 1200–1600

(NEHC 30840, HIST 25901, HIST 35901)

This course examines responses to the Mongol destruction of the Abbasid caliphate in 1258 and the background to formation of regional Muslim empires. Topics include the opening of confessional boundaries; Ibn Arabi, Ibn Taymiyya, and Ibn Khaldun; the development of alternative spiritualities, mysticism, and messianism in the fifteenth century; and transconfessionalism, antinomianism, and the articulation of sacral sovereignties in the sixteenth century. All work in English. This course is offered in alternate years.

Some knowledge of primary languages (i.e., Arabic, French, German, Greek, Latin, Persian, Spanish, Turkish) helpful.

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 20895 The Construction of Jewish History in Israel

The course concerns the ways Jewish history has been constructed and conceptualized in the State of Israel since 1948. It will examine academic and para academic research, popular history books, TV series, educational programs, national archives and public ceremonies.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 20896 The Mizrahi Discourse in Israel

(HIST 25905, NEHC 30896)

The course concerns the many ways Oriental Jews are represented in Israeli discourse: in academic writings, in history curricula, in Israeli novels and films, in ethnic museums and in political discourse. It will also discuss Mizrahi self-identities as manifested in protest movements, civil organizations, and political parties. The course will take a chronological path and will follow the changes that occurred in the discourse about ethnicity from the state`s early years until recent days.

Miriam Frenkel, Miriam Frenkel
2018-2019 Winter

NELG 20901 Advanced Seminar in Comparative Semitic Linguistics

(NELG 40301, LGLN 20901)

This course is an advanced seminar in Comparative Semitics that critically discusses important secondary literature and linguistic methodologies concerning topics in the field, including topics in phonology, morphology, syntax, etc.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Comparative Semitics. Undergraduates require consent of instructor.

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 20937 Nationalism, colonialism and post-colonialism in the Middle East

(NEHC 30937)

The seminar covers the history of the region during the 19th and 20th centuries. It looks at how the modern historiography of modern Middle Eastern studies shaped, and was shaped by, post-colonial studies, subaltern studies, and historical perceptions of urbanity, modernity, Orientlaism, and class. The class will pay heed to the fluid and constructed nature of Arab national culture, and the terminology used by Arab nationalists concerning ""nahda," “revival,” and “rebirth.” We will explore various "golden ages" Arab nationalists envisioned, like pre-Islamic Semitic empires, the first Islamic state under the leadership of the Prophet Muhammad, the Ummayds, the Abbasids and Muslim Spain, as a way of analyzing the the constructed and temporal nature of national discourses. We will finally examine the distinction between Pan-Arab nationalism (qawmiyya), which considered Arab culture, history, and language as markers of one's national identity, and often strove for political unity with other Arab states; and territorial-patriotic nationalism (wataniyya), which hailed the national cultures of particular Arab states (Egyptian, Iraqi, Lebanese), focusing on their geography, archaeology, and history the key features of national identity.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 21010 The Age of Innovation – Famous Firsts 5000 years ago

(SIGN 26016)

“The first man on moon”, “the first Thanksgiving” or “the first kiss” – our society is still fascinated and remembers the exact moment something happened for the first time. The history of the Ancient Near East, especially the ancient civilization of Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), is quite rich of such “firsts in history”.
From the moment, writing is discovered there is an abundance of textual record, covering the first documents about politics, law, and economics. The first private documents allow us a glimpse into what living and dying were life like more 5000 years ago.

This class will explore what the cultural conditions of those innovations are and how innovations transform societies and why it matters to study ancient civilizations.

By discovering primary sources (in English translation), the fascination of reading those texts for the “first” time will be experienced. Visits at the Oriental Institute Museum will link textual record and object-based inquiry.

2018-2019 Spring

ARAB 29001 Arabic Through Film

This course immerses the student in Arabic through the genre of film, specifically, Egyptian film, a potent and pervasive medium since Arabs started making films in the 1920s, but more pervasive with the advent of television in the early 1960s. Proceeding chronologically, we examine the Egyptian film through distinct stages, from the early musicals and romantic comedies of the forties and fifties, to the slew of post-1952 films offering new notions of the nation, of citizens, of womanhood, to the films of the 1970s with their commentary on the new capitalist society Sadat espoused, to the nuanced realism and focus on individual angst of the 1980s and 90s, to the gritty realism of the pre and post Arab Spring period.

2018-2019 Autumn

HEBR 30001 Intensive Modern Hebrew

In this intensive, three-quarter sequence course student will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study. The course brings students to high-intermediate levels in all four skills: reading, writing, comprehension and grammar so that students can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew. With the main emphasis this course places on grammar, students that graduates this course successfully can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew

2018-2019 Autumn

NEAA 20002/30002 Archaeology of the Ancient Near East-2: Anatolia

This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the archaeology and art of the Near East from prehistoric times to the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Each course in the sequence focuses on a particular cultural region.

2018-2019 Autumn

HEBR 30002 Intensive Modern Hebrew

In this intensive, three-quarter sequence course student will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study. The course brings students to high-intermediate levels in all four skills: reading, writing, comprehension and grammar so that students can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew. With the main emphasis this course places on grammar, students that graduates this course successfully can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew

2018-2019 Winter

HEBR 30003 Intensive Modern Hebrew

In this intensive, three-quarter sequence course student will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study. The course brings students to high-intermediate levels in all four skills: reading, writing, comprehension and grammar so that students can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew. With the main emphasis this course places on grammar, students that graduates this course successfully can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20004/30004 Ancient Near Eastern Thought & Literature-1: Mesopotamia

This course gives an overview over the richness of Mesopotamian Literature (modern Iraq) written in the 3rd-1st millennium BC. We will read myths and epics written on clay tablets in Sumerian and Akkadian language in English translation and discuss content and style, but also the religious, cultural and historic implications. Special focus will be on the development of stories over time, historical context of the literature and mythological figures. The texts treated cover not only the famous Epic of Gilgamesh, but also various legends of Sumerian and Akkadian kings, stories about Creation and World Order, and destruction. The topics covered range from the quest for immortality, epic heros and monsters, sexuality and love.

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 30019 Mesopotamian Law

(SIGN 26022, law and letters (Ask dennis hutchinson))

NEHC 30019. Mesopotamian Law, LLSO 20019 SIGN 26002. Ancient Mesopotamia -- the home of the Sumerians, Babylonians, and Assyrians who wrote in cuneiform script on durable clay tablets -- was the locus of many of history's firsts. No development, however, may be as important as the formations of legal systems and legal principles revealed in contracts, trial records, and law collections (codes), among which The Laws of Hammurabi (r. 1792-1750 BC) stands as most important for understanding subsequent legal practice and thought of Mesopotamia's cultural heirs in the Middle East and Europe until today. This course will explore the rich source materials of the Laws and relevant judicial and administration documents (all in English translations) to investigate topics of legal, social, and economic practice including family formation and dissolution, crime and punishment (sympathetic or talionic eye for an eye, pecuniary, corporal), and procedure (contracts, trials, ordeals).

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 20025/30025 Introduction to Islamic Law

Is Islam a religion or a political ideology? What is sharīʿa and what is sharīʿa law? What do Muslims mean when they use terms like sharīʿa, fiqh and Islamic law? Does Islamic law represent a challenge to the authority of the nation-state? In this course, we will examine all of these issues and more.In this course, we will approach Islamic law from three main angles, jurisprudence, substantive law, and the judiciary. The substantive areas of Islamic law to be covered include the following: ritual worship, family and personal status law, criminal law, contract law, constitutional & international law. We will also be dealing with the challenges posed by the advent of modernity and colonialism to Muslims' understanding and practice of Islamic law. The course will combine readings in primary and secondary literature with case studies to illustrate the workings of Islamic law. The main textbooks will be Wael Hallaq's Introduction to Islamic Law and Knut Vikor's Between God and the Sultan: A History of Islamic Law. Supplemental readings will be provided from other works. Students will be required to write three 3-4 page response papers, take a midterm and a final exam. The final exam will comprise take home essay questions.

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 30032 Imagining the Text: Books and Manuscripts in the Ancient ME

(NEHC 20032)

Imagining the Text: Books and Manuscripts in the Ancient Middle East offers a unique perspective within the larger paradigm of approaches to the written word known as the “History of the Book.” While many such courses look only briefly at pre-printed textual material, this course will provide an overview on the use of texts from antiquity (from the earliest writing to the Middle Ages) in the Middle East. Site visits to local repositories will provide hands-on experience with papyri, clay tablets, parchment, vellum, and rare books. Readings and discussions will explore what is meant by the term “text” in order to deeply investigate the methodologies of book history and textual criticism.The course will be organized around two primary themes: methodology and pre-print manuscript culture. During the first five weeks, we will look at how texts are studied, thereby setting a foundation for looking at actual examples in the second part of the course. The central component of the course will be spent deeply studying the pre-print manuscript culture from across the ancient Middle East in a roughly chronological order. We will devote significant time to the transmission of texts in the ancient Mediterranean world, an area of particular interest to me that is rarely covered with such depth in a "book history" class. During this time, we will have several site visits to area institutions to see firsthand treasures from their collections, including cuneiform tablets preserving the epic of Gilgamesh, papyrus copies of the Egyptian Book of the Dead, fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Coptic prayer books, Syriac hagiographies, ancient Greek biblical manuscripts, medieval monastic literature, and much more. In the final weeks of the course, we will turn to the early revolution of paper and print technology.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEAA 30071 Texts in Context

This course investigates public and private buildings in which ancient records have been found in situ, seeking to find correlations based on architecture, artifacts, and the contents of texts. Often, in the past, the findspots of texts have not been meticulously recorded, resulting in the loss of valuable information on the function of specific buildings or even rooms in buildings; the layout of a building can also give information that can add significantly to the interpretation of the texts.

2018-2019 Spring

NEAA 30091 Field Archaeology

This course takes place outside of Chicago and can only be taken by arrangement with the instructor well in advance of the quarter in which it is offered.

2018-2019 Autumn

TURK 30101 Advanced Turkish-1

Advanced Turkish / Ottoman Turkish class is designed for students with at least two years of Turkish or equivalent experience. The course is organized in two modules. The first module aims to develop advanced language skills in Modern Turkish through reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with special emphasis on the proper usage of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. In the second module, the students will be introduced to the Ottoman Turkish language through primary sources. This module aims to provide students with Ottoman reading, transliteration and translation skills primarily for printed material, and to introduce them to Ottoman grammar. Students will be given the option to follow only one of the modules upon consultation with the instructor.

Prerequisites: TURK 20103 or equivalent.

2018-2019 Autumn

TURK 30102 Advanced Turkish-2

Advanced Turkish / Ottoman Turkish class is designed for students with at least two years of Turkish or equivalent experience. The course is organized in two modules. The first module aims to develop advanced language skills in Modern Turkish through reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with special emphasis on the proper usage of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. In the second module, the students will be introduced to the Ottoman Turkish language through primary sources. This module aims to provide students with Ottoman reading, transliteration and translation skills primarily for printed material, and to introduce them to Ottoman grammar. Students will be given the option to follow only one of the modules upon consultation with the instructor.

Prerequisites: TURK 30101 or equivalent.

2018-2019 Winter

EGPT 30120 Intro to Demotic

Intro to Demotic script and grammar

2018-2019 Winter

EGPT 30121 Demotic Texts

Reading course in Demotic texts

2018-2019 Spring

AANL 30130 Advanced Readings in Hittite: Rituals

2018-2019 Autumn

ARAB 30201 High Intermediate Modern Arabic

This is a three course sequence in High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic.

2018-2019 Autumn

ARAB 30202 High Intermediate Modern Arabic

This is a three course sequence in High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic.

2018-2019 Winter

ARAB 30203 High Intermediate Modern ARabic

This is a three course sequence in High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic.

2018-2019 Spring

ARAB 30301 High Intermediate Classical Arabic 1

This is a three-segment course offered in three quarters; Autumn, Winter and Spring. The main objective of the complete three segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues. Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20103 or equivalen

2018-2019 Autumn

ARAB 30302 High Intermediate Classical Arabic 2

This is a three-segment course offered in three quarters; Autumn, Winter and Spring. The main objective of the complete three segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues. Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20103 or equivalen

2018-2019 Winter

ARAB 30303 High Intermediate Classical Arabic 3

This is a three-segment course offered in three quarters; Autumn, Winter and Spring. The main objective of the complete three segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues. Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20103 or equivalen

2018-2019 Spring

NEAA 30331 Households, Kinship, and Demography in the Ancient Levant

In this course we will read widely in the archaeological, historical, and sociological literature pertaining to ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern households, kinship, and demography, with attention to methodological issues involved in interpreting relevant archaeological and textual evidence.

2018-2019 Winter

AKKD 30375 Akkadian Literature: Late Period

This course explores a variety of key issues in ancient narrative, by means of investigating the role of literature as history in the Erra Epic, features of orality or aurality such as verse, meter, and prosody in The Poor Man of Nippur, as well as the appropriation and reinterpretation of metaphors and other figurative imagery in Marduk's Address to the Demons and its ancient commentary.

Prerequisites: One year of Akkadian.

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 30466 Coping with Changing Climates in Early Antiquity I

This two-quarter seminar is offered as part of an ongoing collaborative research project called “Coping with Changing Climates in Early Antiquity: Comparative Approaches Between Empiricism and Theory,” developped jointly at the University of Chicago, the University of Michigan and Purdue University. Using a shared syllabus at the three institutions, and some joint sessions in the form of webinars, the seminar will cover the theoretical framework that allows for an in-depth understanding of the relations between human societies and their environments, and on social response to change in their social, political and environmental climates (Winter quarter); it will present a series of case studies in three key geographic areas: Egypt and Nubia; the Eastern Mediterranean and Anatolia; and Mesopotamia (Spring quarter). Students will be exposed to cross-cultural approaches and will be able to interact with partners at other institutions through an online discussion group. Students will have the opportunity to work collaboratively (2-3 students) within their institution and across institutions on a research project of their choice, whose results will be presented at a poster session during the project's final conference in 2020, and will then be exhibited at the three partner institutions in the course of Academic Year 2020-2021.

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 30467 Coping with Changing Climates in Early Antiquity II

This two-quarter seminar is offered as part of an ongoing collaborative research project called “Coping with Changing Climates in Early Antiquity: Comparative Approaches Between Empiricism and Theory,” developped jointly at the University of Chicago, the University of Michigan and Purdue University. Using a shared syllabus at the three institutions, and some joint sessions in the form of webinars, the seminar will cover the theoretical framework that allows for an in-depth understanding of the relations between human societies and their environments, and on social response to change in their social, political and environmental climates (Winter quarter); it will present a series of case studies in three key geographic areas: Egypt and Nubia; the Eastern Mediterranean and Anatolia; and Mesopotamia (Spring quarter). Students will be exposed to cross-cultural approaches and will be able to interact with partners at other institutions through an online discussion group. Students will have the opportunity to work collaboratively (2-3 students) within their institution and across institutions on a research project of their choice, whose results will be presented at a poster session during the project's final conference in 2020, and will then be exhibited at the three partner institutions in the course of Academic Year 2020-2021.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20470/30470 Fashioning Identities in Ancient Egypt

The rich material and visual culture of Ancient Egypt provide an opportunity to study costume from various perspectives and through a variety of sources. Contact with different groups of foreigners was always omnipresent in Egypt, and when they ruled the country (e.g. Hyksos, Libyan, Kushites, Assyrians, Persian, Greeks, Roman), they exposed Egypt to outward culture and fashion. This presents an opportunity to inquire if and how the political situation affected the way Egyptian dressed, as costume is a powerful means to assimilate and acculturate a wearer in society.
This course will give a quick overview of the Egyptian costume through the lens of art historical sources as well as of the organic remains of textiles. It will demonstrate how to use clothing as a tool to investigate a distant civilization. By analyzing the clothing of Egyptians and foreigners, it will familiarize students with ancient wardrobe, as well as provide an overview of Egyptian art and material culture. It will investigate the importance of clothing as a marker of the self and its role as an expression and negotiation of identity. The attire will be set in a broad socio-cultural perspective where the meaning of dress in terms of various identities, whether social (including gender and ethnicity), political, and/or religious, will be questioned. 
Aleksandra Hallman
2018-2019 Spring

TURK 30501 Ottoman Turkish-1

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2018-2019 Autumn

TURK 30502 Ottoman Turkish-2

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2018-2019 Winter

TURK 30503 Ottoman Turkish-3

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2018-2019 Spring

ARAB 30588 Media Arabic

Media Arabic is a course designed for the advanced student of Modern Standard Arabic. The course objective is to improve students' listening comprehension skills. Students will advance toward this goal through listening to a variety of authentic materials from Arabic TV (on politics, literature, economics, education, women, youth, etc.).

2018-2019 Winter

ARME 30601 Advanced Mid Armenian-1

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an advanced level of proficiency in the Armenian language. Reading, discussion and writing assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

2018-2019 Autumn

ARME 30602 Advanced Mid Armenian-2

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an advanced level of proficiency in the Armenian language. Reading, discussion and writing assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

ARME 30601

2018-2019 Winter

AKKD 20603/30603 Intermediate Akkadian: Neo-Assyrian Royal Inscriptions

This course is specifically aimed at students having completed the first year of Elementary Akkadian (AKKD 10101–10103), but can be taken by more advanced students as well. Building on the knowledge acquired in the Elementary sequence, this course will further explore the Standard Babylonian dialect and Neo-Assyrian Cuneiform scripts, through a detailed analysis of the Annals of king Sennacherib (704–681 BCE) as they are represented in the ‘Chicago Prism' acquired by J. H. Breasted in 1920 and currently on display in the Assyrian gallery of the Oriental Institute Museum. These include, among other military and building exploits of the king, his campaign to the Levant against Ezekiah, king of Judah — an episode also recounted in the Hebrew Bible (books of Second Kings, Isaiah and Chronicles) and Josephus' Judean Antiquities.

Prerequisites: One year of Elementary Akkadian/Intro to Babylonian

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 30605 Coll: Sources for the Study of Islamic History

(NEHC 20605, HIST 26005, HIST 36005)

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic problems and concepts as well as the sources and methodology for the study of premodern Islamic history. Sources will be read in English translation and the tools acquired will be applied to specific research projects to be submitted as term papers. Offered in alternate years.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 30645 History of the Fatimid Caliphate

(NEHC 20645, HIST 34401, 24401.)

This course will cover the history of the Fatimid (Shiite) caliphate, from its foundation in the North Africa about 909 until its end in Egypt 1171. Most of the material will be presented in classroom lectures. Sections of the course deal with Fatimid history treated chronologically and others with separate institutions and problems as they changed and developed throughout the whole time period. Readings heavily favored or highly recommended are all in English.

2018-2019 Spring

NEHC 20677/30677 Beyond Genocide & Diaspora: Armenians in the Middle East

Despite the genocide, Armenians have known thriving political, sociocultural, ideological, and ecclesiastical centers in the twentieth century. The seminar Beyond Genocide & Diaspora: Armenians in the Middle East focuses on such centers: in Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Egypt, Iran, and Turkey, amongst others. This will not be a journey of loss or simple rebirth, perspectives omnipresent in writings on modern Armenian history. Rather, we will be analyzing the history of power: on how Armenians experienced the everyday and the ordinary in the Middle East,  making these places their own, and how they manipulated and managed loss and renewal. At the same time, this seminar asks: what can we learn about these spaces, and the region more broadly, by looking at it through the lens of everyday Armenian sociopolitics? This analysis of Armenians does not only contribute to the study of Armenians, then. Rather, it shows how Armenians in the Middle East experienced politics everyday, and what those experiences can teach us about interlinked national and global events. This course also examines changing aspects of belonging, and explores how these concepts travel over time and space.

2018-2019 Winter

ARAB 30800 Arabic for Heritage Learners

This course is meant to prepare heritage speakers of Arabic to enter either Arabic 202 or Arabic 302 in the Winter Quarter. By “heritage” learners, we mean those students who know the alphabet, speak or have spoken Arabic at home, are familiar with a broad vocabulary but lack the grammatical underpinnings of Arabic, its case system, its structure, verb forms, etc. As such, the course will train students in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Modern Standard Arabic, but with an overt and systematic focus on grammar. Materials used will be authentic, up-to-date, and relevant to student interests.

2018-2019 Autumn

AKKD 20801/30801 Reforms and Edicts of the Old Babylonian Kings

Minimum 1 Year Akkadian

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 30832 Topics in Late Ottoman History

This course will examine important themes in late Ottoman history such as institutional reform, the development of consultative structures, taxation, capitulations, and nationalism.

Qualified undergrads may register with instructor consent

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 30852 The Ottoman World in the Age of Suleyman the Magnificent

(HIST 58302)

This two-quarter seminar focuses on the transformation of the Muslim Ottoman principality into an imperial entity--after the conquest of Constantinople in 1453--that laid claim to inheritance of Alexandrine, Roman/Byzantine, Mongol/Chinggisid, and Islamic models of Old World Empire at the dawn of the early modern era. Special attention is paid to the transformation of Ottoman imperialism in the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Lawgiver (1520-1566), who appeared to give the Empire its “classical” form. Topics include: the Mongol legacy; the reformulation of the relationship between political and religious institutions; mysticism and the creation of divine kingship; Muslim-Christian competition (with special reference to Spain and Italy) and the formation of early modernity; the articulation of bureaucratized hierarchy; and comparison of Muslim Ottoman, Iranian Safavid, and Christian European imperialisms. The first quarter comprises a chronological overview of major themes in Ottoman history, 1300-1600; the second quarter is divided between the examination of particular themes in comparative perspective (for example, the dissolution and recreation of religious institutions in Islamdom and Christendom) and student presentations of research for the seminar paper. In addition to seminar papers, students will be required to give an oral presentation on a designated primary or secondary source in the course of the seminar.

Upper level undergrads with consent only; reading knowledge of at least 1 European Language recommended

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 30853 The Ottoman World in the Age of Suleyman the Magnificent

(HIST 58303)

This two-quarter seminar focuses on the transformation of the Muslim Ottoman principality into an imperial entity--after the conquest of Constantinople in 1453--that laid claim to inheritance of Alexandrine, Roman/Byzantine, Mongol/Chinggisid, and Islamic models of Old World Empire at the dawn of the early modern era. Special attention is paid to the transformation of Ottoman imperialism in the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Lawgiver (1520-1566), who appeared to give the Empire its “classical” form. Topics include: the Mongol legacy; the reformulation of the relationship between political and religious institutions; mysticism and the creation of divine kingship; Muslim-Christian competition (with special reference to Spain and Italy) and the formation of early modernity; the articulation of bureaucratized hierarchy; and comparison of Muslim Ottoman, Iranian Safavid, and Christian European imperialisms. The first quarter comprises a chronological overview of major themes in Ottoman history, 1300-1600; the second quarter is divided between the examination of particular themes in comparative perspective (for example, the dissolution and recreation of religious institutions in Islamdom and Christendom) and student presentations of research for the seminar paper. In addition to seminar papers, students will be required to give an oral presentation on a designated primary or secondary source in the course of the seminar.

Upper level undergrads with consent only; reading knowledge of at least 1 European Language recommended

2018-2019 Winter

PERS 20921/30921 Satire Against Tyranny: 20th C. Iran in Satirical Works

This is not just a literature course: it is at the same time an exploration of Iran’s recent history as mirrored in satirical works. Against the background of Iran’s recent history, from late Qajar period to present, this course will focus on a selection of satirical works (mainly in verse, but also some prose) in Persian language. Apart from a thorough review of the recent history, and apart from providing a lot of fun through satirical works, the students will be introduced to more advanced Persian. The secondary sources recommended will include articles, interviews and reviews in both Persian and English. 

2018-2019 Winter

NEHC 30943 Sem: Iran and Central Asia-1

(HIST 58601)

The first quarter will take the form of a colloquium on the sources for and the literature on the political, social, economic, technological, and cultural history of Western and Central Asia from 900 to 1750. Specific topics will vary and focus on the Turks and the Islamic world, the Mongol universal empire, the age of Timur and the Turkmens, and the development of the "Gunpowder Empires." The second quarter will be devoted to the preparation of a major research paper.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 30944 Sem: Iran and Central Asia-2

(HIST 58602)

The second quarter will be devoted to the preparation of a major research paper.

2018-2019 Winter

ARAB 40200 Advanced Readings in Arabic

Advanced Readings in Arabic

2018-2019 Autumn

AKKD 40200 War, Trade, and Curses: Akkadian Treaties

Treaties written in Akkadian are one of the oldest surviving witnesses of international law. Furthermore, those texts give an insight in the organization of international trade, the treatment of fugitives, and state organization. The curse – an integral part to protect the legal arrangements – give us furthermore information about religion, fears and believes, and forms of divine punishments. In this class we will read and discuss selected treaties from different periods of Mesopotamian history: we will start with Old Babylonian and Old Assyrian documents, read texts from the so-called “International Age”, and end with the Neo-Assyrian Succession Treaty of Esarhaddon.

Prerequisites: One year of Akkadian and Intermediate Akkadian.

2018-2019 Spring

ARAB 40356 The Modern Arabic Novel

This is a graduate level survey course of the rise and development of the modern Arabic novel. It will cover texts from the nahḍa to the late twentieth century. We will read these texts with particular attention not only to the ways they engage the key social and political issues of their day, but also to the manner in which they probe central questions of form, genre, and language. By reading the novels alongside theoretical readings in English and Arabic that frame them, we will also interrogate the processes of the formation of the modern Arabic literary canon.

Prerequisites: Three years of Arabic at UChicago or their equivalent.

2018-2019 Autumn

TURK 40589 Colloquium: Advanced Ottoman Historical Texts

(HIST 58301)

Based on selected readings from major Ottoman chronicles from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries, the course provides an introduction to the use of primary narrative materials and an overview of the development and range of Ottoman historical writing. Knowledge of modern and Ottoman Turkish required.

2018-2019 Autumn

ARAB 40629 Nahj al-balagha: Virtue and Piety in the Teachings of Ali

(ISLM 40629, FNDL 22629)

Through a close reading and analysis of the orations, epistles and words of wisdom attributed to Ali ibn Abi Talib in the Nahj al-balagha, this course will explore an early stage of the development of these three important prose genres of classical Arabic literature, and Ali's key themes and stylistic features. A main focus of the class will be on themes of virtue and piety.

Prerequisites: Three years of Arabic. Open to qualified undergraduates with Instructor's permission.

2018-2019 Autumn

NEHC 40630 Early Islamic Texts

(ISLM 49630)

The course introduces students to Islamic texts of the first two centuries, covering early Islamic poetry, history, sira, hadith collections, law, theology, and political polemics. In the process, we address the overall questions of how and to what extent historical events and ideas of the early period can be reconstructed, what hitherto un- or underused sources might be at our disposal, and what approaches and methods could be appropriate for examining these sources.

Prerequisites: Two years of Arabic or the equivalent.

2018-2019 Autumn

ARAB 40630 Balagha Seminar: Jurjani’s Asrar al-Balagha & Dala’il al-I’jaz

(ISLM 40631, FNDL 22630)

This course on classical Arabic literary theory will focus on close reading of sections from the seminal works of Abd al-Qahir al-Jurjani: Asrar al-balagha and Dala'il al-Ijaz.

Prerequisites: Three years of Arabic. Open to qualified undergraduates with instructor's permission.

2018-2019 Winter

AKKD 44000 Advanced Akkadian Syntax

This class is designed to provide an advanced grammar course focusing on syntactic topics for students who have intermediate or advanced knowledge of Akkadian. The class will read texts from different periods and genres to compare the treatment of certain syntactic structures.

Prerequisites: Intermediate Akkadian.

2018-2019 Spring

UZBK 29700/49900 Independent Study: Uzbek

2018-2019 Autumn

KAZK 29700/49900 Independent Study: Kazakh

2018-2019 Spring

UZBK 29700/49900 Independent Study: Uzbek

2018-2019 Spring

UZBK 29700/49900 Independent Study: Uzbek

2018-2019 Winter

TURK 29710/49901 Independent Study: Old Turkic

2018-2019 Autumn

TURK 29701/49901 Independent Study: Old Turkic

An introductory course in the written language of the Orkhon Inscriptions, dating back to the 5th-8th Century Kök Türk State of Central Eurasia, and of related inscriptions from the Yenisei River area, Mongolia, Central Asia and Eastern Europe. The language of the inscriptions is considered to be the ancestor of the majority of Turkic languages spoken today, and uses a distinctive alphabet sometimes known as the Old Turkic Runiform Alphabet. The course covers a brief historic overview, basic grammar, reading selections from the inscriptions in the original and in translation, and familiarization with the alphabet itself. 

2018-2019 Spring

TURK 29710/49901 Independent Study: Old Turkic

2018-2019 Winter