Courses

Courses
Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library.

Please use this page to search for courses in the current academic year and recent past. However, the most up-to-date version of our current course schedule with full time, date, and location information will always be on Class Search.

Subject Code Guide

NELC sorts courses by subject code. Most languages or language groups have a unique code. Courses under a language subject code include both introductory language sequences and advanced topics that may require knowledge of the language.

Students looking for non-language courses are generally going to be interested in NEAA and NEHC courses.

AANL Ancient Anatolian Languages (includes Hittite, Lycian, Lydian)
AKKD Akkadian (including Intro to Babylonian) 
ARAB Arabic
ARAM Aramaic
ARME Armenian
EGPT Egyptology 
GEEZ Ge'ez
HEBR Hebrew (Modern and Classical)
KAZK Kazak
NEAA Near Eastern Art and Archaeology
NEHC Near Eastern History and Civilizations
NELG Near Eastern Languages (usually topics in Comparative Semitics)
PERS Persian
SUMR Sumerian
TURK Turkish (includes Ottoman Turkish and Old Turkic)
UGAR Ugaritic
UZBK Uzbek

 

Courses

NEHC 20012 Ancient Empires-II (Ottoman Empire)

(HIST 15603, CLCV 25800)

The Ottomans ruled in Anatolia, the Middle East, South East Europe and North Africa for over six hundred years. The objective of this course is to understand the society and culture of this bygone Empire whose legacy continues, in one way or another, in some twenty-five contemporary successor states from the Balkans to the Arabian Peninsula. The course is designed as an introduction to the Ottoman World with a focus on the cultural history of the Ottoman society. It explores identities and mentalities, customs and rituals, status of minorities, mystical orders and religious establishments, literacy and the use of the public sphere.

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 20601 Islamic Thought and Literature I

This sequence explores the thought and literature of the Islamic world from the coming of Islam in the seventh century C.E. through the development and spread of its civilization in the medieval period and into the modern world. Including historical framework to establish chronology and geography, the course focuses on key aspects of Islamic intellectual history: scripture, law, theology, philosophy, literature, mysticism, political thought, historical writing, and archaeology. In addition to lectures and secondary background readings, students read and discuss samples of key primary texts, with a view to exploring Islamic civilization in the direct voices of the people who participated in creating it. All readings are in English translation. No prior background in the subject is required. This course sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 26151 History of Iraq in the 20th Century

The class explores the history of Iraq during the years 1917-2015. We will discuss the rise of the Iraqi nation state, Iraqi and Pan-Arab nationalism, and Iraqi authoritarianism. The class will focus on the unique histories of particular group in Iraqi society; religious groups (Shiis, Sunnis, Jews), ethnic groups (especially Kurds), classes (the urban poor, the educated middle classes, the landed and tribal elites), Iraqi women, and Iraqi tribesmen. Other classes will explore the ideologies that became prominent in the Iraqi public sphere, from communism to Islamic radicalism. We will likewise discuss how colonialism and imperialism shaped major trends in Iraqi history. The reading materials for the class are based on a combination of primary and secondary sources: we will read together Iraqi novels, memoirs and poems (in translation), as well as British and American diplomatic documents about to Iraq.

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 29899 Research Colloquium

Required of fourth-year students who are majoring in NELC. This is a workshop course designed to survey the fields represented by NELC and to assist students in researching andcompleting their Research Project. Students must get a Reading and Research form from their College Adviser and complete the form in order to be registered. Signatures are needed from the adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Please indicate on the form that you wish to register for NEHC 29899 Section 01.

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 10101 Introduction to the Middle East

(HIST 15801)

Prior knowledge of the Middle East not required. This course aims to facilitate a general understanding of some key factors that have shaped life in this region, with primary emphasis on modern conditions and their background, and to provide exposure to some of the region's rich cultural diversity. This course can serve as a basis for the further study of the history, politics, and civilizations of the Middle East.

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 20005 Ancient Near Eastern Thought & Literature: 2. Anatolian Literature

The goal of this class is to get an overview of Hittite literature, as “defined” by the Hittites themselves, in the wider historical-cultural context of the Ancient Near East. Some of the most important questions we can ask ourselves in reading ancient texts are: why were they written down, why were they kept, for whom were they intended, and what do the answers to these questions (apart from the primary content of the texts themselves) tell us about — in our case — Hittite society?

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 20013 Ancient Empires: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550-1069 BCE), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and become one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion, which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 20305 Language, Creation, and Translation in Jewish Thought and Literature

Starting with two stories from Genesis - the creation story and the story of the Tower of Babel in chapter 11 – this course considers the intertwined dynamics of language, creation, and translation in Jewish thought and literature. In addition to commentaries on both of these key texts, we will read philosophical and literary texts that illuminate the workings of language as a creative force and the dynamics of multilingualism and translation in the creation of Jewish culture. Through this lens, we will consider topics such as Gender and Sexuality, Jewish national identity, Zionism, the revival of the Hebrew language, Jewish responses to the Holocaust, and contemporary American Jewish culture.

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 20603 Islamic Thought and Literature III

This course covers the period from ca. 1700 to the present. It explores Muslim intellectuals’ engagement with tradition and modernity in the realms of religion, politics, literature, and law. We discuss debates concerning the role of religion in a modern society, perceptions of Europe and European influence, the challenges of maintain religious and cultural authenticity, and Muslim views of nation-states and nationalism in the Middle East. We also give consideration to the modern developments of transnational jihadism and the Arab Spring. This course sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 20006 Ancient Near Eastern Thought & Literature-3. Egypt

This course employs English translations of ancient Egyptian literary texts to explore the genres, conventions and techniques of ancient Egyptian literature. Discussions of texts examine how the ancient Egyptians conceptualized and constructed their equivalent of literature, as well as the fuzzy boundaries and subtle interplay between autobiography, history, myth and fiction.

2020-2021 Winter

NEHC 20011 ANCIENT EMPIRES 1: THE HITTITE EMPIRE

This course introduces students to the Hittite Empire of ancient Anatolia. In existence from roughly 1650-1200 BCE, and spanning across modern Turkey and beyond, the Hittite Empire is one of the oldest and largest kingdoms of the ancient world. We will be examining their history and their political and cultural accomplishments through analysis of their written records – composed in Hittite, the world’s first recorded Indo-European language – and their archaeological remains. In the process, we will also be examining the concept of “empire” itself: What is an empire, and how do anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians study this unique kind of political formation?

2020-2021 Winter

NEHC 20602 Islamic Thought & Literature II

What were the famous and funny, nice and naughty, sacred and profane, scholarly and popular, silly and profound books read in the pre-modern Muslim world? How did people understand their status in the cosmos, their place in the world, their role in society, their relation to other peoples?
This course provides an overview of the thought and literature of the Islamic world as it developed across a broad geographic area stretching across the central Islamic lands from Morocco and Iberia to the Maldives and India – even into the New World – during the “middle periods” (c. 950 – 1750 C.E.). We engage with a wide variety of primary texts in English translation, as well as various visual, aural and material artifacts, contextualizing them through lectures, secondary readings and discussion. We trace a range of ideas, institutions, and literary works, considering them both on their own merits, and how they evolved in response to changing historical, demographic and religious circumstances. We explore the interaction of culture, ethnicity, history, politics and religion in the creation of individual Muslim identities and a multi-faceted Islamicate civilization (consisting of its intellectual milieu; literary, artistic and musical production; social organization; scientific, philosophical and theological thought; religious, educational, governmental, commercial and social institutions; geographic, ethnic, confessional, gender, social and spatial constructs). In brief, how did noteworthy Muslims at various points and places think through questions of life & death, man & God, faith & belief, the sacred & the profane, law & ethics, tradition vs. innovation, power & politics, class & gender, self & other? How did they wage war; make love; shape the built environment; eat & drink; tell stories; educate their youth; preserve the past; imagine the future; perform piety, devotion and spirituality; construe the virtuous life and righteous community, etc.? How did these ideas change over time?

Prerequisites

Islamic Thought & Lit-1 or Islamic History and Society -1 or the equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

NEHC 21010 The Age of Innovation - Famous Firsts 5,000 Years Ago

"The first man on moon", "the first Thanksgiving," or "the first kiss"--our society is still fascinated and remembers the exact moment something happened for the first time. The history of the Ancient Near East, especially the ancient civilization of Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), is quite rich of such "firsts in history." From the moment, writing is discovered there is an abundance of textual record, covering the first documents about politics, law, and economics. The first private documents allow us a glimpse into what living and dying were like more than 5,000 years ago. This course will explore what the cultural conditions of those innovations were, how innovations transform societies, and why it matters to study ancient civilizations. By discovering primary sources (in English translation), the fascination of reading those texts for the "first" time will be experienced. Visits at the Oriental Institute Museum will link textual record and object-based inquiry.

2020-2021 Winter

NEHC 29995 Research Project

In consultation with a faculty research adviser and with consent of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, students devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of their Research Project. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Please indicate that you wish to register for NEHC 29995 Section 01 with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. 

2020-2021 Winter

HEBR 10101 Elementary Classical Hebrew I

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to acquire a knowledge of the vocabulary and grammar of Classical Hebrew sufficient to read prose texts with the occasional assistance of a dictionary. The first quarter focuses on the inflection of nouns and adjectives and begins the inflection of verbs. It includes written translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis of forms.

Prerequisites

none

2020-2021 Autumn

EGPT 10101 Introduction to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs 1

This course and its sequel EGPT 10102 provide an introduction to the hieroglyphic writing system, vocabulary and grammar of Middle Egyptian, the 'classic' phase of the Egyptian language developed during the Middle Kingdom (circa 2025-1773 BCE) and used until the disappearance of hieroglyphs over two thousand years later.

2020-2021 Autumn

ARAM 10101 Biblical Aramaic

This course provides a thorough introduction to the grammar of the Aramaic portions of the Hebrew Bible during the first few weeks. The remainder of the course is spent reading texts from the books of Daniel and Ezra.

Prerequisites

HEBR 10103 or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

ARME 10101 Elementary Modern Armenian-1

This three-quarter sequence focuses on the acquisition of basic speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in modern formal and spoken Armenian. The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling students to master the alphabet, a core vocabulary, and some basic grammatical structures in order to communicate their basic survivor’s needs in Armenian, understand simple texts and to achieve a minimal level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian.
A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, to visit or to pursue work in Armenia. A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement.

2020-2021 Autumn

TURK 10101 First Year Turkish III

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

Prerequisites

None

2020-2021 Autumn

ARAB 10101 Elementary Arabic I

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Prerequisites

None

PERS 10101 Elementary Persian-1

This sequence concentrates on modern written Persian as well as modern colloquial usage. Towards the end of the sequence the students will be able to read, write and speak Persian at an elementary level. Introducing the Iranian culture is also a goal. The class meets three hours a week with the instructor and two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Prerequisites

None

AANL 10101 Elementary Hittite 1

As part of a three quarter sequence, this course familiarizes the student with about 3/4 of Hittite grammar. The principles of the cuneiform writing system are taught and the student will learn some 100 signs of the basic syllabary and most important logograms. Also, a begin is made of introducing the student to the basic tools of the field.

Prerequisites

none

2020-2021 Autumn

PERS 10102 Elementary Persian-2

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Prerequisites

Elementary Persian-1

AANL 10102 Elementary Hittite 2

As part of a three-quarter sequence, this second quarter we finish the grammar and start reading Hittite texts, introducing the student to the various genres that Hittite literature has to offer. We will continue the introduction of important tools of the field and students will acquire further routine in reading cuneiform.

Prerequisites

none

2020-2021 Winter

EGPT 10102 Introduction to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs 2

This course completes an introduction to the hieroglyphic writing system, vocabulary and grammar of Middle Egyptian, the 'classic' phase of the Egyptian language developed during the Middle Kingdom (circa 2025-1773 BCE) and used until the disappearance of hieroglyphs over two thousand years later. It also begins an introduction to ancient Egyptian culture and society through a close reading of its 'classic' literature.

Prerequisites

EGPT 10101 or equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

HEBR 10102 Elementary Classical Hebrew II

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to acquire a knowledge of the vocabulary and grammar of Classical Hebrew sufficient to read prose texts with the occasional assistance of a dictionary. The second quarter focuses on verb inflection and verbal sequences and includes written translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis of forms.

Prerequisites

HEBR 10101 or equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

ARAM 10102 Old Aramaic Inscriptions

Selected monumental inscriptions from the Old Aramaic period (c. 1000-600 BCE) are read with special attention to the dialectal differences among various subgroups of texts.

Prerequisites

ARAM 10101

2020-2021 Winter

ARAB 10102 Elementary Arabic II

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Prerequisites

ARAB 10101 or equivalent

ARME 10102 Elementary Modern Armenian-2

This three-quarter sequence focuses on the acquisition of basic speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in modern formal and spoken Armenian. The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling students to master the alphabet, a core vocabulary, and some basic grammatical structures in order to communicate their basic survivor’s needs in Armenian, understand simple texts and to achieve a minimal level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian.
A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, to visit or to pursue work in Armenia. A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement.

Prerequisites

ARME 10101 or equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

TURK 10102 First Year Turkish III

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

Prerequisites

TURK 10101

2020-2021 Winter

EGPT 10103 Middle Egyptian Texts 1

This course continues an introduction to ancient Egyptian culture and society through a close reading of its 'classic' literature from the Middle Kingdom (circa 2025-1773 BCE) and beyond, until the disappearance of hieroglyphs over two thousand years later.

Prerequisites

EGPT 10102 or equivalent

2020-2021 Spring

AANL 10103 Elementary Hittite III

This is the third in a three-quarter sequence that covers the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of the Hittite language. It also familiarizes the student with the field's tools (i.e., dictionaries, lexica, sign list). Readings come from all periods of Hittite history (1650 to 1180 B.C.).

2020-2021 Spring

HEBR 10103 Elementary Classical Hebrew III

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to acquire a knowledge of the vocabulary and grammar of Classical Hebrew sufficient to read prose texts with the occasional assistance of a dictionary. The first half of the third quarter concludes the study of verb inflection and the second half is spent reading prose narrative texts with specific attention to the grammatical analysis of those texts.

Prerequisites

HEBR 10102 or equivalent

2020-2021 Spring

ARAM 10103 Imperial Aramaic

Selected letters and contracts from the Imperial Aramaic period (c. 600-200 BCE) are read with special attention to the historical development of the grammar of Aramaic during this time period.

Prerequisites

ARAM 10102

2020-2021 Spring

ARME 10103 Elementary Modern Armenian-3

This three-quarter sequence focuses on the acquisition of basic speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in modern formal and spoken Armenian. The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling students to master the alphabet, a core vocabulary, and some basic grammatical structures in order to communicate their basic survivor’s needs in Armenian, understand simple texts and to achieve a minimal level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian.
A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, to visit or to pursue work in Armenia. A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement.

Prerequisites

ARME 10102 or equivalent

2020-2021 Spring

TURK 10103 First Year Turkish III

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

Prerequisites

TURK 10102 and TURK 10103

2020-2021 Spring

ARAB 10103 Elementary Arabic III

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Prerequisites

ARAB 10102 or equivalent

PERS 10103 Elementary Persian-3

This sequence concentrates on modern written Persian as well as modern colloquial usage. Towards the end of the sequence the students will be able to read, write and speak Persian at an elementary level. Introducing the Iranian culture is also a goal. The class meets three hours a week with the instructor and two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Prerequisites

Elementary Persian-2

ARAB 10250 Colloquial Levantine Arabic I

Spoken Levantine Arabic is a proficiency-based course designed to develop the linguistic skills necessary for personal day-to-day life. The course focuses on spoken rather than Standard written Arabic, and will therefore target primarily the oral/aural skills. Through the knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic and the introduction of colloquial vocabulary, expressions and grammar, the course will build the students’ competence in spoken Arabic. Students will also be introduced to the Levantine culture of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Palestine.

2020-2021 Autumn

ARAB 10257 Colloquial Levantine Arabic I

Colloquial Levantine Arabic is a proficiency-based course designed to develop the linguistic skills necessary for personal day-to-day life. The course focuses on spoken rather than Standard written Arabic, and will therefore target primarily the oral/aural skills. Through the knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic and the introduction of colloquial vocabulary, expressions, and grammar, the course will build the students’ competence in spoken Arabic. Students will also be introduced to the Levantine culture.

2020-2021 Winter

HEBR 10501 Introductory Modern Hebrew

a three-quarter course designed primarily for college students. Meets three times a week: two 1:20hr sessions with the instructor and one 50-minute tutorial with a TA.
This course would follow the existing model. It will focus on gaining basic command in the four language skills: speaking, reading, listening, and writing, in that order.

Prerequisites

None

2020-2021 Autumn

AKKD 10501 Introduction to Babylonian I

Introduction to the grammar of Akkadian, specifically to the Old Babylonian dialect. The class covers the first half of the Old Babylonian grammar, an introduction to the cuneiform script, and easy translation exercises.

Prerequisites

None.

2020-2021 Autumn

AKKD 10502 Introduction to Babylonian 2

This course is the second quarter of the annual introductory sequence to the Babylonian language and the Cuneiform script. Students will further explore the grammar of Babylonian in its Old Babylonian dialect (19th-16th c. BCE) and read ancient inscriptions (especially the Laws of Hammu-rabi) in the Old Babylonian monumental script. They will also be introduced to the Old Babylonian cursive used in letters and the documents of everyday life.

Prerequisites

AKKD 10501. Introduction to Babylonian 1

2020-2021 Winter

HEBR 10502 Introductory Modern Hebrew

a three-quarter course designed primarily for college students. Meets three times a week: two 1:20hr sessions with the instructor and one 50-minute tutorial with a TA.
This course would follow the existing model. It will focus on gaining basic command in the four language skills: speaking, reading, listening, and writing, in that order.

Prerequisites

none

2020-2021 Winter

AKKD 10503 Introduction to Babylonian III: Divinatory Texts

Akkadian readings in a wide variety of divinatory cuneiform texts, including omens from extispicy, teratology, libanomancy, medical diagnosis, and lunar eclipses, among others. Students are graded based on their preparation and mastery of cuneiform script—Old Babylonian cursive, in particular—and Akkadian philology.

Prerequisites

Introduction to Babylonian in preceding Fall and Winter quarters

2020-2021 Spring

HEBR 10503 Introductory Modern Hebrew

a three-quarter course designed primarily for college students. Meets three times a week: two 1:20hr sessions with the instructor and one 50-minute tutorial with a TA.
This course would follow the existing model. It will focus on gaining basic command in the four language skills: speaking, reading, listening, and writing, in that order.

Prerequisites

none

2020-2021 Spring

UGAR 20101 Ugaritic I

An introduction to the Ugaritic language (epigraphy and grammar) and literature from an inductive perspective, readings from a mythological text

Prerequisites

Intermediate Classical Hebrew I-III or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

ARME 20101 Intermediate Modern Armenian-1

The course is aiming to enable students to reach a reasonable level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The curriculum is heavily based on real life situations. Each class session includes a healthy balance of real-life like conversations (shopping, placing an order in a restaurant, asking directions, talking with natives, getting around in the city, banking, etc.), readings (dialogues, jokes, stories, news, etc.) and writings (essays on selected topics, filling forms, etc.). The students can also communicate in Armenian well beyond basic needs about the daily life and obtain some level of fluency in their professional interests. This sequence covers a wider-range vocabulary and more complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments also include a selection of simple original Armenian literature.
A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, or to pursue work in Armenia.

Prerequisites

ARME 10103 or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

ARAB 20101 Intermediate Arabic I

The first quarter of Intermediate Arabic

Prerequisites

ARAB 10103 or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

PERS 20101 Intermediate Persian-1

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Prerequisites

Elementary Persian-3

TURK 20101 Intermediate Turkish I

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish. Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency. Prerequisite(s): TURK 10103, or equivalent with intermediate level proficiency test.

Prerequisites

TURK 10103, or equivalent with intermediate level proficiency test

2020-2021 Autumn

PERS 20102 Intermediate Persian-2

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Prerequisites

Intermediate Persian-1

TURK 20102 Intermediate Turkish II

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish. Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency.

2020-2021 Winter

UGAR 20102 Ugaritic II

Continutation of Ugaritic I, epigraphy and grammar, readings from prose texts.

Prerequisites

Ugaritic I

2020-2021 Winter

ARME 20102 Intermediate Modern Armenian-2

The course is aiming to enable students to reach a reasonable level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The curriculum is heavily based on real life situations. Each class session includes a healthy balance of real-life like conversations (shopping, placing an order in a restaurant, asking directions, talking with natives, getting around in the city, banking, etc.), readings (dialogues, jokes, stories, news, etc.) and writings (essays on selected topics, filling forms, etc.). The students can also communicate in Armenian well beyond basic needs about the daily life and obtain some level of fluency in their professional interests. This sequence covers a wider-range vocabulary and more complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments also include a selection of simple original Armenian literature.
A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, or to pursue work in Armenia.

Prerequisites

ARME 20101 or equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

ARAB 20102 Intermediate Arabic II

The second quarter of Intermediate Arabic

Prerequisites

ARAB 20101 or equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

ARAB 20103 Intermediate Arabic III

ARAB 20103 is the spring quarter continuation of the Intermediate Arabic sequence that began with ARAB 20101 last fall, and continued with ARAB 20102 in the winter. We will continue to work through the second half of Al-Kitaab Part 2. As in any language course, we address all four of the fundamental skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A particular focus of this sequence, however, is ensuring that students have a solid, comprehensive understanding of the rules of Arabic syntax. In addition to readings and exercises from the textbook, we will increasingly make use of articles from Arabic-language news media.

Prerequisites

ARAB 20102 or equivalent

2020-2021 Spring

PERS 20103 Intermediate Persian-3

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Prerequisites

Intermediate Persian-2

TURK 20103 Intermediate Turkish III

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish. Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency.

2020-2021 Spring

UGAR 20103 Ugaritic III

Continuation of Ugaritic I-II, epigraphy and grammar, readings open

Prerequisites

Ugaritic I-II

2020-2021 Spring

ARME 20103 Intermediate Modern Armenian-3

The course is aiming to enable students to reach a reasonable level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The curriculum is heavily based on real life situations. Each class session includes a healthy balance of real-life like conversations (shopping, placing an order in a restaurant, asking directions, talking with natives, getting around in the city, banking, etc.), readings (dialogues, jokes, stories, news, etc.) and writings (essays on selected topics, filling forms, etc.). The students can also communicate in Armenian well beyond basic needs about the daily life and obtain some level of fluency in their professional interests. This sequence covers a wider-range vocabulary and more complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments also include a selection of simple original Armenian literature.
A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, or to pursue work in Armenia.

Prerequisites

ARME 20102 or equivalent

2020-2021 Spring

HEBR 20104 Intermediate Classical Hebrew I

Continuation of Elementary Classical Hebrew, including review of grammar, reading new prose texts, and an introduction to historical grammar

Prerequisites

Elementary Classical Hebrew I-III or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

HEBR 20105 Intermediate Classical Hebrew II

Continuation of Intermediate Classical Hebrew I, including strengthening of skills in grammar, introduction to Biblical Hebrew poetry, and continuation of introduction to historical grammar

Prerequisites

Intermediate Classical Hebrew I

2020-2021 Winter

HEBR 20106 Intermediate Classical Hebrew III

Continuation of Intermediate Classical Hebrew I and II, including strengthening skills in grammar, emphasis on syntax; continuation of study of Biblical Hebrew poetry, selections from prophets; introduction to reading from an original Massoretic text; introduction to reading from the Dead Sea Scrolls, biblical manuscripts; continuation of introduction to historical grammar

Prerequisites

Intermediate Classical Hebrew II

2020-2021 Spring

EGPT 20110 Introduction to Old Egyptian

This course provides an introduction to the hieroglyphic writing system, vocabulary and grammar of Old Egyptian, the phase of the Egyptian language used during the Old Kingdom (circa 2686-2181 BCE). It also provides an introduction to the culture and society of Egypt's 'Pyramid Age' through a close reading of monumental texts from private tombs, royal and private stelae, administrative decrees, economic documents, and Pyramid texts. Some attention is given to Old Egyptian texts written in cursive Hieratic.

Prerequisites

EGPT 10101-10103 or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

AANL 20125 Advanced Readings in Hittite

This course focuses on a particular genre of Hittite texts. The Hittite texts are read in cuneiform and placed it in their social-historical context and the reading hones the student's philological skills.

Prerequisites

AANL 10101-10102-10103

2020-2021 Autumn

HEBR 20202 Reading Hebrew for Research Purposes

The main objective is to teach students a broad range of skills necessary to read scholarly articles and primary materials in students’ fields of study, written in Modern Hebrew.

Due to the fact that the background of each student is different as far as his or hers past experience with Hebrew, a grammar survey is going to be the first step.

The goal of this course is for the students to achieve high comprehension level. (Please note: This course does not intend to teach official rules and forms of translation). By the end of the course, students should feel confident in their ability to read any given Hebrew text, fiction and non-fiction.

Prerequisites

Students should have at least two years of Modern Hebrew and/or one year of Biblical Hebrew. Students should be able to read Hebrew texts without vowels as well as cursive Hebrew

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

EGPT 20220 Texts and Society in the Nubian Kingdom of Napata

This course examines the culture and society of the Nubian kingdom of Napata (circa 750-350 BCE) through a close reading of its texts written in the ancient Egyptian language and hieroglyphic script. We will also review the language and script of the Nubian kingdom of Meroe (circa 350 BCE - 350 CE), in order to look for possible language contact in the Napatan texts written in ancient Egyptian.

Prerequisites

EGPT 10101-10103 or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

AANL 20302 Luwian-2: Second Millennium Texts

This course focuses on the Hieroglyphic and Cuneiform Luwian inscriptions of the second millennium BC. Since Hieroglyphic Luwian I (AANL 20301) is a prerequisite, this course will only offer a very brief grammatical refresher, and will immediately start with the texts. We will read the large 13th century hieroglyphic texts of Tudhaliya IV and a few Cuneiform Luwian rituals from the 15th and 14th century.

Prerequisites

AANL 20301/1 Hieroglyphic Luwian I

2020-2021 Winter

ARAB 20390 Arabic in Social Context

This is a course for the advanced student of Arabic, focusing on improving listening comprehension and instilling an awareness of the social associations accompanying different speech styles. Through intensive exposure to a variety of authentic oral texts (talk shows, songs, soap operas, films, news shows, ads, comedy skits, etc.), students will delve into current social and political issues, as well as become sensitive to code switching between MSA and colloquial (all the major dialects). Through these texts, we will examine the themes of diglossia and code-switching; gendered discourse; urban-rural differences; class differences; youth language. A heavily aural course, class activities will involve student presentations (group and solo), discussion groups, and a final oral presentation project.

Prerequisites

Two Years of Arabic study or consent of instructor

2020-2021 Winter

AANL 20501 Lycian

This course introduces the grammar and writing system of the Lycian language of the first millennium BC (ca. 500 to 300). After reading a series of tomb inscriptions, we venture into the larger historical inscriptions that include the Lycian-Greek-Aramaic trilingual of Xanthos.

Prerequisites

Elementary Hittite or consent from instructor

2020-2021 Spring

HEBR 20502 Intermediate Modern Hebrew

The course aims to consolidate and broadens all four skills in order to help with the transition from easy Hebrew to regular Hebrew.

Prerequisites

Students should have at least one year of Modern Hebrew

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

HEBR 20503 Intermediate Modern Hebrew

The course aims to consolidate and broadens all four skills in order to help with the transition from easy Hebrew to regular Hebrew.

Prerequisites

Students should have at least one year of Modern Hebrew

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

ARAB 20588 Media Arabic

Media Arabic is a course designed for the advanced student of Modern Standard Arabic. The course objective is to improve students' listening comprehension and writing skills. Students will advance toward this goal through listening to and reading a variety of authentic materials from Arabic Media (on politics, literature, economics, education, women, youth, etc.).

Prerequisites

At least two years of Modern Standard Arabic

2020-2021 Spring

AKKD 20601 Intermediate Akkadian: Myths of Creation and Destruction

Akkadian readings of passages, mainly from the Babylonian Creation Epic (enuma elish) and the Babylonian Flood Story (Atrahasis), as well as from the Babylonian Theodicy, Gilgamesh, and the Myth of Seven Sages. Students are expected to master grammatical and narratival content, become familiar with the use of modern dictionaries and other Assyriological resources, and improve their proficiency in reading directly from Assyrian and Babylonian cursive cuneiform scripts.

Prerequisites

1 year of Introduction to Babylonian

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 20692 Armenian History through Art and Culture

(HIST 25711, ARTH 20692)

Who are the Armenians and where do they come from? What is the cultural contribution of Armenians to their neighbors and overall world heritage? This crash-course will try to answer these and many other similar questions while surveying Armenian history and elements of culture (mythology, religion, manuscript illumination, art, architecture, etc.). It also will discuss transformations of Armenian identity and symbols of 'Armenianness' through time, based on such elements of national identity as language, religion, art, or shared history. Due to the greatest artistic quality and the transcultural nature of its monuments and artifacts, Armenia has much to offer in the field of Art History, especially when we think about global transculturation and appropriation among cultures as a result of peoples' movements and contacts. The course is recommended for students with interest in Armenian Studies or related fields, in Area or Civilizations Studies, Art and Cultural Studies, etc.

2020-2021 Winter

AANL 20901 Hurrian

This class introduces the student to the grammar and texts of the Hurrian language. In addition we will read a number of representative texts in Hurrian.

Prerequisites

none

2020-2021 Spring

TURK 29701 Introduction to Old Turkic

Introduction to the Old Turkic Language, Culture & History through the reading of the Orkhon Inscriptions (8th Century AD).

2020-2021 Autumn

NEAA 20002/30002 Archaeology of the Ancient Near East 2: Anatolia

This course will survey the archaeological record of ancient Anatolia (modern Turkey) from the start of the Pre-Pottery Neolithic period (ca. 9500 BCE) to the end of the Iron Age (ca. 550 BCE). The material will cover a selection of significant archaeological sites designed to illustrate the diversity of cultures in Anatolia and to demonstrate broader regional patterns and themes. The presentation of sites will be accompanied by readings and discussions on the interpretation of archaeological data.

2020-2021 Spring

NEAA 20003/30003 Art & Archaeology of the Near East 3: The Levant

This course surveys the archaeology of the Levant from the Stone Age to the early Roman period, with emphasis on the Bronze and Iron Ages. For the periods after the Iron Age, the focus will be on the Southern Levant.

Prerequisites

None

2020-2021 Winter

NEHC 20004/30004 Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I: Mesopotamian Literature

This course gives an overview of the richness of Mesopotamian Literature (modern Iraq) written in the 3rd-1st millennium BC. We will read myths and epics written on clay tablets in the Sumerian and Akkadian language in English translation and discuss content and style, but also the religious, cultural and historic implications. Particular focus will be on the development of stories over time, the historical context of the literature and mythological figures. The texts treated cover not only the famous Epic of Gilgamesh, but also various legends of Sumerian and Akkadian kings, stories about Creation and World Order, and destruction. The topics covered range from the quest for immortality, epic heroes and monsters, sexuality and love.

Prerequisites

None

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 20019/30019 Mesopotamian Law

NEHC 20019 (= NEHC 30019, SIGN 26022, LLSO 20019) Mesopotamian Law.

Ancient Mesopotamia -- the home of the Sumerians, Babylonians, and Assyrians who wrote in cuneiform script on durable clay tablets -- was the locus of many of history's firsts. No development, however, may be as important as the formations of legal systems and legal principles revealed in contracts, trial records, and law collections (codes), among which The Laws of Hammurabi (r. 1792-1750 BC) stands as most important for understanding subsequent legal practice and thought of Mesopotamia's cultural heirs in the Middle East and Europe until today. This course will explore the rich source materials of the Laws and relevant judicial and administration documents (all in English translations) to investigate topics of legal, social, and economic practice including family formation and dissolution, crime and punishment (sympathetic or talionic eye for an eye, pecuniary, corporal), and procedure (contracts, trials, ordeals).

Prerequisites

none

2020-2021 Winter

NEAA 20030/30030 Rise of the State in the Ancient Near East

This course provides an introduction to the background and development of the first urbanized civilizations in the Near East in the period from 9000 to 2200 BC. In the first half of the course we will examine the archaeological evidence for the "Neolithic Revolution" - the first domestication of plants and animals and the earliest Neolithic village communities in the "fertile crescent" - the Levant, Anatolia, Mesopotamia and western Iran. The second half of the course will focus on the "Urban Revolution" - the economic and social transformations which took place during the development from, village based communities to the emergence of the urbanized civilizations of the Sumerians and neighboring groups in Mesopotamia during the fourth and third millennia BC.

Prerequisites

No pre-requisites

2020-2021 Winter

NEAA 20035/30035 Introduction to Zooarchaeology

This course provides undergraduate and graduate students with an introduction to the use of animal bones in archaeological research. Students will gain hands-on experience analyzing faunal remains from an archaeological site in the Near East. The class will address theoretical and methodological issues involved in the use of animal bones as a source of information about prehistoric societies. The course consists of lectures, laboratory sessions, and original research projects using collections of animal bone from archaeological excavations in southeast Turkey. Topics covered include: 1) identifying, ageing and sexing animal bones; 2) zooarchaeological sampling, measurement, quantification, and problems of taphonomy; 3) analysis of animal bone data; 4) reconstructing prehistoric hunting and pastoral economies, especially: animal domestication, hunting strategies, herding systems, seasonality, and pastoral production in complex societies.

Prerequisites

no prerequisites

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 30055 Topics in Medieval and Early Modern Historiography

The course will take its start from combing the “Histories” and “Politics” sections, and their commentaries, and listings of the recently published Inventory of the Ottoman Palace Library of Sultan Bayezid II of 1502-1503 (Treasures of Knowledge:  An Inventory of the Ottoman Palace Library (1502-1503/1503-1504), eds. G. Necipoglu, C. Kafadar, C.H. Fleischer, 2 vols., Brill 2019), to develop a map of the Arabic, Persian, and Turkish historiographical and political theoretical terrain that formed the foundation of the early modern Islamic understanding of history as science, and its mobilization in the interest of reestablishment of universalist sovereignty in the sixteenth century and beyond.  It will then proceed to selected readings in original languages, selections to be determined by linguistic capacities and focus of participants.

2020-2021 Autumn

NEAA 20100/30100 Archaeological Methods and Interpretations

The first part of this course surveys the history of archaeology as a discipline and the methods used by archaeologists to obtain evidence about past human activity via excavations, surface surveys, and remote-sensing technologies; and also surveys the methods used to date, classify, and analyze various kinds of evidence after it has been obtained. The second half of the course surveys the main paradigms in social theory and examines the theoretical concepts and assumptions archaeologists have used to make sense of what they find.

Prerequisites

None

2020-2021 Winter

TURK 30101 Third Year (Advanced) Turkish

Advanced Turkish students will develop their language skills in speaking, reading, translating, listening, and writing, while learning about Turkish society and culture at the same time. To address all of these aspects each class is divided into three sections which focuses on a specific skill.

Section one is conversation: it involves reading (or listening to) short (audio) pieces or phrases on a given topic; section two is reading and translation: students read and prepare pieces from Turkish literature, literature readings are short stories or selected parts from novels; section three is listening: by watching parts of a Turkish movie, students' skills in listening and understanding will get faster while we progress through the film.

Prerequisites

First and Second Year Turkish

2020-2021 Autumn

TURK 30102 Advanced Turkish II

Advanced Turkish students will develop their language skills in speaking, reading, translating, listening, and writing, while learning about Turkish society and culture at the same time. To address all of these aspects each class is divided into three sections which focusses on a specific skill. Section one is the conversation part: it involves reading (or listening to) short (audio) pieces or phrases on a given topic; section two is reading and translation: students read and prepare pieces from Turkish literature, literature readings are short stories or selected parts from novels; section three is the listening part: by watching parts of a Turkish movie, students' skills in listening and understanding will get faster while we progress through the movie.

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 30120 The History of Muslim Histories

This course surveys Muslim history-writing in Arabic from its beginnings to the nineteenth century. Through reading the work of historians such as al-Baladhuri, al-Tabari, Miskawayh, Ibn ‘Asakir, Ibn Khaldun, and al-Jabarti, we investigate different genres of historical writing and examine the various methodologies employed by Muslim historians.

Prerequisites

3 years of Arabic or the equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

EGPT 30120 Introduction to Demotic

This course provides a basic introduction to the grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles of the Egyptian language phase and script used for administrative, literary and some religious and magical texts from the Late Period (664-332 BCE) through the Graeco-Roman Periods (332 BCE - 298 CE).

Prerequisites

EGPT 10101-10103 or equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

EGPT 30121 Demotic Texts

Building on the basic grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles learned in EGPT 30120, this course focuses on the reading and analysis of various Demotic administrative, literary, religious and magical texts from the Late Period (664-332 BCE) through the Graeco-Roman Periods (332 BCE - 298 CE).

Prerequisites

EGPT 30120 or equivalent

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 30123 Islamic Doxography

This course explores the Islamic tradition of doxography—the study of sectarian differences. We read works by al-Balkhi, (pseudo?)al-Jubba’i, al-Ash‘ari, al-Nawbakhti, al-Shahrastani, and Ibn Hazm to understand what the genre of doxography consisted of, which methods its authors deployed, and how they envisioned the Muslim community and sectarian identities within it.

Prerequisites

3 years of Arabic or the equivalent

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 20201/30201 Islamicate Civilization I: 600-950

This course covers the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and early Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain. The main focus will be on political, economic and social history.

Prerequisites

none

2020-2021 Autumn

ARAB 30201 High Intermediate Arabic (Modern)

This course is part of a sequence that is designed to take students to a solid Advanced proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. It does this by clustering materials that serve all 4 language skills around three cultural themes. The class adheres to a 90% Arabic instruction. Students will move forward in their ability to listen to and understand spoken MSA, to read a variety of authentic texts (literary and other), and to speak and write more easily on topics of general and professional interest. By the end of the course, and surely, by the end of the academic year, students should be comfortable functioning at the Intermediate High-Advanced Low level of language proficiency. See the descriptions of the ACTFL standards and levels here: https://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/public/ACTFLProficiencyG…

Prerequisites

Two years of MSA, ACTFL Intermediate High level

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 20202/30202 Islamicate Civilization II: 950-1750

This course, a continuation of Islamicate Civilization I, surveys intellectual, cultural, religious and political developments in the Islamic world from Andalusia to the South Asian sub-continent during the periods from ca. 950 to 1750. We trace the arrival and incorporation of the Steppe Peoples (Turks and Mongols) into the central Islamic lands; the splintering of the Abbasid Caliphate and the impact on political theory; the flowering of literature of Arabic, Turkic and Persian expression; the evolution of religious and legal scholarship and devotional life; transformations in the intellectual and philosophical traditions; the emergence of Shi`i states (Buyids and Fatimids); the Crusades and Mongol conquests; the Mamluks and Timurids, and the "gunpowder empires" of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Moghuls; the dynamics of gender and class relations; etc. This class partially fulfills the requirement for MA students in CMES, as well as for NELC majors and PhD students.

Prerequisites

Islamicate Civilization I (NEHC 20201) or Islamic Thought & Literature-1 (NEHC 20601), or the equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

ARAB 30202 High Intermediate Arabic (Modern)

Arabic Through Debate

Taking debate as its central fulcrum, the course will develop all 4 language skills. Its language goals are served through preparing students to debate a number of issues of public interest.
Why “debate”?
a) Because debating, arguing, making claims, supporting claims with evidence, are all authentic activities that we all practice on a daily basis; debating is a relevant real-life skill;
b) Because the debate process pulls practitioners into all 4 language skills: debaters must read on the proposition topic, they must prepare their arguments in writing, they must clearly speak to an audience, and they must listen carefully to their team mates and to the arguments of the opposing team. In the process, they will be immersed in Arab culture (targeted expressions and historical references, of-the-moment issues, etc.)

Course Objectives
a) Expanding student vocabulary and structures into the abstract, analytic realm, i.e., placing them solidly in the advanced ACTFL levels (see the descriptions of the ACTFL standards and levels here: https://www.actfl.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/public/ACTFLProficiencyG…
b) Improving student speech techniques: pronunciation, intonation/voice modulation, pausing, emphasis, gesturing, visual communication;
c) Improving listening and writing skills and expanding them to include topics of general and academic interest;
d) Through a thoughtful selection of debate propositions, exposing students to some salient social, cultural, and political themes of importance to the Arab public.
e) Sharpening the logical argumentative skills of students.

Prerequisites

Two years of Arabic or their equivalent, or, consent of instructor

2020-2021 Winter

NEHC 20203/30203 Islamicate Civilization III: 1750-Present

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

Prerequisites

Islamicate Civilization II (NEHC 20202) or Islamic Thought & Literature-2 (NEHC 20602), or the equivalent

2020-2021 Spring

ARAB 30203 High Intermediate Arabic (Modern)

Arabic Through Extensive Reading
In this course, students will read a whole work, most often, but not exclusively, a novel or play. Nevertheless, the course advances student proficiency in all 4 skills.
Naturally, reading is a central activity of this course. Students in the Intermediate High range* can expect to either feel more solidly comfortable in that level, or to go beyond it to the Advanced level. Students will improve their writing through a number of essays/reflections on the novel.
The course is taught in Arabic, so, students will be negotiating meaning amongst themselves by discussing the novel. In addition, the presentational mode will be exercised in a series of prepared class presentations. To improve their listening skills, students will work on video materials connected to the novel, testing their abilities through worksheets.
While no new grammar will be introduced in a formal manner, as students read the novel and use the writing book, they will be reviewing grammar studied earlier.

In addition to the novel, students will benefit from guest speakers in our classroom.

Prerequisites

Two years of Arabic, or the equivalent, or, consent of instructor

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 20235/30235 Imaging Armenia: Diaspora and the Constitution of Subjectivity

What does it mean to be “Armenian”? Despite centuries of dispersion and displacement, there has remained, in the Armenian diaspora, a sense of Armenian-ness—a sense, in other words, of being Armenian. This course will serve as an interrogation of and meditation on what that sense of being has looked like across time and space, as seen through the lens of pivotal musical and other artistic works from the post-genocide diaspora. Through in-depth analyses of these works and the discourses surrounding them, this course will trace the emergence, articulation, and negotiation of Armenian diasporic subjectivities and the ways in which those subjectivities have emerged in relation to and in conversation with power structures both internal and external to the Armenian communities under discussion. Diaspora, then, will be approached not as a fixed unit of analysis, but as something that emerges and is sustained through complex relationships and negotiations with sociopolitical forces both within and outside the diasporic community. Through this course, we will see that artistic expression in the Armenian diaspora functions as a site of agency: a site in which the question of what it is to be Armenian is explored in ways that shape, challenge, and upend notions and understandings of diasporic identity.

Sylvia Alajaji
2020-2021 Spring

NELG 20301/30301 Introduction to Comparative Semitics

This course examines the lexical, phonological, and morphological traits shared by the members of the Semitic language family. We also explore the historical relationships among these languages and the possibility of reconstructing features of the parent speech community.

Prerequisites

Knowledge of two Semitic languages or one Semitic language and Historical Linguistics.

2020-2021 Autumn

ARAB 30301 High Intermediate Arabic (Classical)

First quarter of Classical High Intermediate Arabic

Prerequisites

ARAB 20103 or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

ARAB 30302 High Intermediate Arabic (Classical)

Second quarter of Classical High Intermediate Arabic

Prerequisites

ARAB 30301 or equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

ARAB 30303 High Intermediate Arabic (Classical)

Third quarter of Classical High Intermediate Arabic

Prerequisites

ARAB 30302 or equivalent

2020-2021 Spring

NEAA 30330 The Neo-Hittite and Aramaean City-States

This seminar explores the city-state system that arose in the eastern Mediterranean at the beginning of the Iron Age, ca. 1200 B.C.E. Most commonly referred to as “Syro-Hittite,” these kingdoms thrived for roughly 500 years until their piecemeal destruction at the hands of the Assyrian Empire. We will examine models for how this city-state system arose following the collapse of the Late Bronze Age political economy, how statehood and social identity were enacted during the centuries of their greatest cultural expressions, and how and why their political structure and cultural patterns came to an end. Our sources will be contemporary inscriptions and the archaeological record of the region. Other topics will include religious practices, military history, and interregional connections with the Assyrian Empire, the Aegean, and Israel/Judah.

2020-2021 Spring

AKKD 20352/30350 Nuzi: Documents from a Late Bronze Age Town

More than 6000 cuneiform documents from a single Late Bronze Age site, ancient Nuzi, dating to a period of only about 150 years, yield unparalleled insights into everyday life in the ancient world. This course will use these resources to explore a series of legal and social phenomena, both private and public, including family/status (marriage, divorce, inheritance, adoption), judicial process (trials, lawsuits), public corruption, political events, and more.

Prerequisites

2 years Akkadian or permission of instructor

2020-2021 Spring

TURK 20350/30350 Readings in Ottoman Court Records

This course introduces the students to the scholarship on and the original texts of Ottoman court records. Thousands of registers with millions of court cases covering the period from the sixteenth century to modern times have survived to date. These documents are celebrated by modern historians as exceptional snapshots into the daily lives of common people. Monday sessions are reserved for the discussion of secondary literature; we will read from the original court records on Fridays.

Prerequisites

Some exposure to Ottoman texts

2020-2021 Winter

SUMR 20401/30401 A School in Nippur

Using the original tablets excavated by the Oriental Institute in Nippur, we will read different texts found in House F, an Old Babylonian School. The class will include introductions to typical genres like lexical texts, model contracts, and literary school texts.

Prerequisites

1 year of Sumerian

2020-2021 Winter

EGPT 30446 Ptolemaic Hieroglyphs

This advanced course examines grammar, scripts and texts typically called "Ptolemaic," but employed in formal, priestly inscriptions of both the Ptolemaic and Roman eras. Texts to be examined include, among others, synod decrees and inscriptions from Dendera, Philae, Edfu, and Esna.

Prerequisites

Prior study of Middle Egyptian through Coptic

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 30455 Topics in Semitic Studies

In this course, we will investigate and discuss prevalent topics in the philological and linguistic study of Semitic languages. The weekly topics will touch on the major sub-categories of grammar and focus on methodology.

Prerequisites

Introduction to Comparative Semitics or equivalent (e.g. general intro to Linguistics). Consent of Instructor required.

2020-2021 Autumn

HEBR 30501 Advanced Modern hebrew

This course assumes that students have full mastery of the grammatical and lexical content of the intermediate level (second year Hebrew or the placement exam are prerequisites). The main objective is literary fluency. The texts used in this course include both academic prose, as well as literature. Students are exposed to semantics and morphology in addition to advanced grammar. Requirements include a weekly class presentation, regular essay writing, two take-home exams, and several quizzes per quarter.

Prerequisites

Students should have at least two years of Modern Hebrew or are placed here following the result of the College Placement Exam

2020-2021 Autumn

TURK 30501 Ottoman Turkish I

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

Prerequisites

2 years of Turkish, or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

NEAA 20501/30501 Introduction to Islamic Archaeology

This course is intended as a survey of the regions of the Islamic world from Arabia to North Africa, from Central Asia to the Gulf. The aim will be a comparative stratigraphy for the archaeological periods of the last millennium. A primary focus will be the consideration of the historical archaeology of the Islamic lands, the interaction of history and archaeology, and the study of patterns of cultural interaction over this region, which may also amplify understanding of ancient archaeological periods in the Near East.

2020-2021 Winter

HEBR 30502 Advanced Modern Hebrew

This course assumes that students have full mastery of the grammatical and lexical content of the intermediate level (second year Hebrew or the placement exam are prerequisites). The main objective is literary fluency. The texts used in this course include both academic prose, as well as literature. Students are exposed to semantics and morphology in addition to advanced grammar. Requirements include a weekly class presentation, regular essay writing, two take-home exams, and several quizzes per quarter.

Prerequisites

Student should have at least two years of Modern Hebrew or are following the results of the College Placement Exam

2020-2021 Winter

TURK 30502 Ottoman Turkish II

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2020-2021 Winter

TURK 30503 Ottoman Turkish III

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2020-2021 Spring

HEBR 30503 Advanced Modern Hebrew

This course assumes that students have full mastery of the grammatical and lexical content of the intermediate level (second year Hebrew or the placement exam are prerequisites). The main objective is literary fluency. The texts used in this course include both academic prose, as well as literature. Students are exposed to semantics and morphology in addition to advanced grammar. Requirements include a weekly class presentation, regular essay writing, two take-home exams, and several quizzes per quarter.

Prerequisites

Students should have at least 2 years of Modern Hebrew or were placed into this level by taking the Placement Exam.

2020-2021 Spring

NEAA 20522/30522 Late Levant: Archaeology of Islamic Syria-Palestine

This course is an exploration of the cultural patterns in the Levant from the late Byzantine period down to modern times, a span of some 1500 years. While the subject matter will be archaeological sites of this period in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan and Israel, the focus will be on the role of medieval archaeology in amplifying the history of economic and social systems. It is this connective quality of Islamic archaeology which contributes to an understanding of the earlier history and archaeology of this region.

Prerequisites

none

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 20605/30605 Colloquium: Sources for the Study of Islamic History

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic problems and concepts as well as the sources and methodology for the study of premodern Islamicate history. Sources will be read in English translation and the tools acquired will be applied to specific research projects to be submitted as term papers.

2020-2021 Winter

NEHC 20658/30658 Narrating Conflict in Modern Arabic Literature

This course is an exploration of conflict in the Arab world through literature, film and new media. In this course, we will discuss the influence of independence movements, wars, and revolts on Arabic literature: how do writers write about, or film, conflict? How does conflict affect language itself? How do these texts engage with issues of trauma and bearing witness? To answer these questions, we will look at a number of key moments of conflict in the Arab world, including the Arab-Israeli conflicts, the Algerian war of independence, the 2011 Egyptian revolution, the Lebanese and Iraq wars, and the ongoing war in Syria. Rather than follow a historical chronology of these events, we will read these texts thematically, beginning with texts that seek to present themselves as direct, sometimes eye-witness, accounts and then moving on to narratives that complicate the relationship between conflict and its narration.

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC /30659 The Task of the Self Translator

Walter Benjamin famously wrote that a translation issues from the “afterlife” of the original: “For a translation comes later than the original, and since the important works of world literature never find their chosen translators at the time of their origins, their translation marks their stage of continued life.” This graduate seminar focuses on the case of multilingual writers and their self-translations to raise questions concerning the temporality, directionality, and “afterlife” of translated works. The figure of the self-translator challenges models of translation and cross-cultural circulation that assume various cultural and historical gaps between the source and its translation. For one, self-translation calls into question the notions of originality or “the original” and of “fidelity,” and requires us to consider the overlap between translation and rewriting. What brought writers to produce the same texts in different languages, at times for similar audiences of multilingual readers? What theories of translation or world literature might be helpful when approaching the case of Jewish self-translation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? We will discuss these issues also in the context of comparative Jewish studies, considering the difference between internal, Hebrew-Yiddish, self-translation, and the translation between Hebrew or Yiddish and a third “non-Jewish” language, whether European or Middle-Eastern.

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 20737/30737 Imperialism before the Age of Empires?

This course offers a critical analysis of the use of concepts such as empire and imperialism in the historiography of ancient Mesopotamia to address political formations that developed (and vanished) from the Early to Late Bronze Ages (mid-3rd to late-2nd millennium BCE). Drawing from theoretical studies on imperialism and the imperial constructions that developed in the Iron Age and beyond (starting with the Neo-Assyrian and Neo-Babylonian empires), this seminar will explore the nature of power, control, and resource management in these early formations, and how they qualify (or not) as imperial policies. Students will address a substantial part of Mesopotamian history (from the Sargonic down to the Middle Assyrian and Babylonian periods) and study in depth some key historiographical issues for the history of Early Antiquity. Primary documents will be read in translation and the course has no ancient language requirements. However, readings of secondary literature in common academic languages (especially French and German) are to be expected.
This course fulfills the requirements of a survey course in Mesopotamian civilization as defined by the Ancient PhD programs in NELC and MA program in the CMES.

2020-2021 Winter

NEHC 30755 Research Topics in Ottoman History

This course will discuss current trends in research for 19th and early 20th C Ottoman and Turkish history

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 20765/30765 Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia

This course explores the musical traditions of the peoples of Central Asia, both in terms of historical development and cultural significance. Topics include the music of the epic tradition, the use of music for healing, instrumental genres, and Central Asian folk and classical traditions. Basic field methods for ethnomusicology are also covered. Extensive use is made of recordings of musical performances and of live performances in the area.

2020-2021 Spring

AKKD 30820 Readings in the letters from Tell el-Amarna

In this course, we will read Akkadian letters from the correspondence found at Tell el-Amarna, Egypt, that date to the 14th century BCE. We will read letters from various locations, including Babyonia, Assyria, Mitanni and Hatti, although the main focus of the class will be on the letters sent from Canaan. In all these corpora we will look at features that mark the language as different from core Babylonian and that reveal substrate influence from the native languages of the scribes.

Prerequisites

Two years of Akkadian

2020-2021 Winter

NEHC 30852 The Ottoman World in the Age of Suleyman the Magnificent

This seminar/colloquim focuses on the transformation of the Muslim Ottoman principality into an imperial entity--after the conquest of Constantinople in 1453--that laid claim to inheritance of Alexandrine, Roman/Byzantine, Mongol/Chinggisid, and Islamic models of Old World Empire at the dawn of the early modern era. Usually taught as a two-quarter reseach seminar, this year only the first quarter is offered, with a 15-20 paper due at the end. Special attention is paid to the transformation of Ottoman imperialism in the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Lawgiver (1520-1566), who appeared to give the Empire its "classical" form. Topics include: the Mongol legacy; the reformulation of the relationship between political and religious institutions; mysticism and the creation of divine kingship; Muslim-Christian competition (with special reference to Spain and Italy) and the formation of early modernity; the articulation of bureaucratized hierarchy; and comparison of Muslim Ottoman, Iranian Safavid, and Christian European imperialisms. The quarter-long colloquium comprises a chronological overview of major themes in Ottoman history, 1300-1600. In addition to papers, students will be required to give an oral presentation on a designated primary or secondary source in the course of the seminar.

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 30891 Sem: Intro to the Ottoman Press-1

Course introduces students to the historical context and specific characteristics of the mass printed press (newspapers, cultural and political journals, etc.) in the Ottoman Empire in the 19th C. We will investigate issues such as content, censorship, production, readership and distribution through secondary reading and the examination of period publications.

2020-2021 Winter

NEHC 30892 Introduction to the Ottoman Press-2

Students will develop their research papers, and we will continue to explore aspects of the late Ottoman press.

2020-2021 Spring

AKKD 20900/30900 Old Assyrian Letters and Documents

This course introduces students to the Assyrian dialect of the early second millennium BCE, as witnessed in the archives of Assyrian merchants operating in the ancient city of Kaneš (modern Kültepe, Turkey). Students will read through a selection of letters, legal texts and administrative documents pertaining to the merchants' activities between Northern Mesopotamia and Anatolia. They will be exposed to the earliest known attestation of the Northern dialect of Akkadian, which differs sensibly from the contemporary Old Babylonian and later Standard Babylonian dialects that are introduced in elementary and intermediate Akkadian courses. Similarly, Old Assyrian cursive paleography has its own rules for sign shapes and values, with some marked differences with contemporary Old Babylonian. Knowledge of the Old Babylonian grammar and cursive cuneiform script are therefore required to take this course, and knowledge of Standard Babylonian and the associated scripts are highly recommended. Due to the restrictions in classroom availabilities imposed by the current pandemic, this course will be offered remotely via Zoom. Evaluation will be based on participation (30%), a midterm take-home exam (30%) and a final take-home exam (40%).

Prerequisites

 Intermediate Akkadian (exceptions possible with instructor’s consent)

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 30937 Nationalism & Colonialism in the Middle East

This graduate seminar offers a historiographical overview of the approaches to sect, religion, minority and gender in colonial and postcolonial contexts in the Middle East. We will discuss the conceptualizations of nationalism by different social scientists; explore the characteristics of Iranian, Turkish and Arab nationalism[s] in the years 1860-1979; examine the history of science and technology in the region and its influence on perceptions of Islamic modernity,; and ask whether sectarianism an old phenomenon or a new one, paying heed to the relationship between minorities and religions in the region.

2020-2021 Autumn

NEHC 21000/31000 Before the Zodiac: Astronomy and Mathematics as Ancient Culture

Taking as its central theme the cultural situatedness of the earliest systems of mathematics and astronomy-from their origins in ancient Mesopotamia (Iraq, c. 3400 BCE) until the Common Era (CE)-this course explores topics in mathematical language and script, metrology, geometry and topology, music theory, definitions of time, models of stars and planets, medical astrology, and pan-astronomical hermeneutics in literature and an ancient board game. Pushing against boundaries separating the humanities and social and physical sciences, students discover how histories of science and mathematics could be decisively shaped not merely by sensory experience or axiomatic definition, but also by ideas and imagery derived from the cultures, societies, and aesthetics of their day.

Prerequisites

none

2020-2021 Spring

NEHC 21215/31215 Abraham's Sacrifice of Isaac in Multiple Perspectives

The story of Abraham’s (near) sacrifice of his son, Isaac, found in Genesis 22:1-19, is one of the most influential and enduring stories in Western literature and art.  It is part of the living tradition of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and its meaning and implications have been repeatedly explored in the communities defined by these religions, and has, in turn, helped to shape the self-perception of those communities.  This course will consider the multiple perspectives from which this story has been viewed and the multiple interpretations which this story has generated, starting with its earliest incorporation into the Hebrew Bible, moving to its role in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and concluding with its influence on modern works.  No knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Prerequisites

None

2020-2021 Spring

ARAB 40200 Advanced Readings

Advanced Readings in Arabic

2020-2021 Autumn

NELG 20901/40301 Advanced Seminar in Comparative Semitics

This course is an advanced seminar in comparative Semitics that critically discusses important secondary literature and linguistic methodologies concerning topics in the field, including topics in phonology, morphology, syntax, etc.

Prerequisites

Intro to Comparative Semitics. Undergraduates require consent of instructor.

2020-2021 Winter

EGPT 40480 Religious Texts

This advanced course entails reading Egyptian religious and magical compositions from the Pyramid Texts through Coptic magical incantations, including diachronic study of funerary literature, hymns and ritual texts. Knowledge of all stages of Egyptian is recommended.

Prerequisites

Prior study of Middle Egyptian through Coptic

2020-2021 Spring

TURK 40589 Advanced Ottoman Historical Texts

Based on selected readings from major Ottoman chronicles from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries, the course provides an introduction to the use of primary narrative materials and an overview of the development and range of Ottoman historical writing. Knowledge of modern and Ottoman Turkish required.

Prerequisites

2 years Modern Turkish, 1 year of Ottoman

2020-2021 Autumn